DSWD’s Kalahi-CIDSS saved Iloilo town from ‘Yolanda’

The crack on the sea wall is the only sign that Typhoon Yolanda caused the waters to rise in Barangay Mangorocoro, as it protected the villagers from the wrath of the typhoonKung wala po iyong sea wall na ginawa sa ilallim ng Kalahi-CIDSS, madami na po ang patay dito dahil sa ‘Yolanda’ (If we did not have the seawall Kalahi-CIDSS, a lot of the residents would have died because of ‘Yolanda’).”

These were the words by Rogelio Labsan, the former Barangay Captain of Brgy. Mangorocoro in Ajuy, Iloilo. His tone was bas fearful as it was proud as he went on to describe how Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS), one of the three main poverty alleviation programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), was able to protect their community from the savagery of Typhoon Yolanda.

Impact in Ajuy

Ajuy was one of the municipalities in Iloilo that was hit hard by the super typhoon, affecting 11,510 households, 7,064 of which totally lost their homes because of the disaster.

As a coastal community, Brgy. Mangorocoro was no stranger to being affected by the elements.

Prior to the construction of the sea wall, current Barangay Captain Conrado Fernandez said that it was normal for the elementary school campus, where a Kalahi-CIDSS school building now stands, to be flooded during high tide, even on normal weather.

It was the constant fear of being flooded that pushed the residents of Brgy. Mangorocoro to raise for the construction of the sea wall during a KALAHI-CIDSS assembly.

They were able to complete the construction of the sea wall in 2010. When presented with another opportunity by Kalahi-CIDSS, they upgraded their sea wall, having it cemented to make it even more durable to better protect them from harm.

It was this foresight that protected them from experiencing the full impact of “Yolanda”.

While some flooding occurred in Brgy. Mangorocoro at the height of the typhoon, their village did not suffer from any casualties because the sea wall protected them from the rising waters.

Simon Hagurin, one of the senior citizens in Brgy. Mangorocoro who served as a volunteer in Kalahi-CIDSS, shared that he did not want to think about what would have happened to their village had the sea wall not been constructed.

This was echoed by Ajuy Mayor Juancho Alvarez, who said, “Kung wala ang ‘Kalahi’ sea wall, washed out na ang Brgy. Mangorocoro (If the sea wall had not been there, Brgy. Mangoroco would have been washed out).”

The thin crack on the sea wall serves as a silent testament of the ferocity of the typhoon.

Community strength

While the residents of Brgy. Mangorocoro are thankful for the construction of the sea wall, what they are more grateful for is how Kalahi-CIDSS has ingrained in them the spirit of participation and cooperation within their village.

As a project that uses the Community-Driven Development (CDD) strategy, Kalahi-CIDSS seeks to develop the skills and capacities of the citizens, even as it strives to teach them to work together in partnership with their local government units (LGUs) to improve their lives.

By empowering them, Kalahi-CIDSS enables them to become active agents in local development. In effect, the project builds up communities so citizens will be able to work together to lift themselves from poverty.

It is this sense of communal support that the residents of Brgy. Mangorocoro keenly felt.

As Sister Alona Marie Abunda, a local pastor who also served as Kalahi-CIDSS volunteer, shared, “Sa Kalahi-CIDSS, dumami ang friends. At dahil dumami ang friends, tumaas ang cooperation (In Kalahi-CIDSS, we gained more friends. And since we now have more friends, we cooperated more).”

This was completely different from their situation before Kalahi-CIDSS entered the community, when the residents did not really work together, according to Sis. Alona.

When Kalahi-CIDSS started, the Project staff had a hard time gathering the residents together.

According to Teacher Cherry Santiago, it was difficult to conduct barangay assemblies at first.

She said, “Bago ang Kalahi-CIDSS, ang hirap mag-barangay assembly. Kailangan mo pang ipatawag isa-isa ang mga tao, tapos kakaunti pa ang nag-a-attend (Before Kalahi-CIDSS, it was difficult to conduct barangay assemblies. You had to invite the residents one by one, and even then, only a few would attend).”

Since then, conducting barangay assemblies was no longer a problem.

Teacher Cherry proudly shared that their attendance rate is at least 90%, because the residents have since learned through Kalahi-CIDSS that these gatherings are opportunities for them to discuss their concerns and how to solve these.

More importantly, they now understand that each one of them has a personal stake in helping their barangay develop.

As Mayor Alvarez said, Kalahi-CIDSS opened the eyes of the LGU and the residents to the reality that “development is a shared responsibility.”

Editha Labsan, who was one of the Procurement Team (PT) volunteers of Kalahi-CIDSS, stated strongly that the Project opened their eyes on what their community needs.

She said that she preferred having sub-projects constructed by Kalahi-CIDSS than by contractors.

She stated, “Baka kung contractor sub-standard. Kapag kami, sigurado ang quality (If a contractor did it, their work may be sub-standard. If we did the work, we can be assured of the quality).”

She continued, “May transparency sa Kalahi-CIDSS (Kalahi-CIDSS has transparency),” explaining that every phase of project construction is open to perusal by anyone, including concerned citizens and even third-party groups and individuals.

Editha’s sentiments were echoed by Lolo Simon, who said, “Sa Kalahi-CIDSS sigurado kami (In Kalahi-CIDSS, we have assurance).”

This self-assurance, as described by Lorelyn Biogos, a teacher in Mangorocoro Elementary School, was because the residents themselves have a personal stake should they encounter problems with their Kalahi-CIDSS sub-projects.

She said, “May sense of ownership ang community (The community has a sense of ownership for these).”

Teacher Lorelyn shared that the reason why she served as one of the Kalahi-CIDSS volunteers in the construction of the school building is because she knew she had a role to play in helping her community.

She said, “This is part of my legacy. May parte ako sa proyekto (I have a part in the project).”

She continued, “Generations will benefit from this project,” a strong statement coming from someone who works in a profession that ensures the protection of future generations.

Kalahi-CIDSS did not just mobilize the residents to work together. It also made them more sensitive to the different needs of the citizens. One such example is on gender.

As Teacher Cherry said, “Ang mga babae nag-pa-participate na. Nakakatulong na sila sa komunidad sa pamamagitan ng Proyekto (Women now participate. They are able to help out the community through the Project).”

The participation of Teacher Cherry and Teacher Lorelyn, as well as that of the others who helped in the implementation of the school building, also played a role in helping protect residents from “Yolanda”, as the structure was used as one of the evacuation centers following the storm.

Teacher Lorelyn is responsible for managing the bank account that will be used for the operations and maintenance of the school building.

“Medyo nabasa (It got a little wet)”, she said, smiling sheepishly as she presented the passbook, explaining how the status of the booklet, which got slightly damaged because of the torrential rains brought by “Yolanda”.

She said that some funds in the account were taken out for minor repairs to the school following the storm.

Continuing partnership between Ajuy and Kalahi-CIDSS

Ajuy, Iloilo is no stranger to Kalahi-CIDSS. The municipality has been implementing this since 2004, almost from the time of the Project’s inception in 2003.

The implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS has earned Ajuy several recognitions, including a DSWD award for being a model LGU in practicing participation, transparency, and accountability for two straight years in 2011 and 2012.

Mayor Alvarez said that the main reason why Kalahi-CIDSS was successful in Ajuy was because it was able to capacitate and empower the people to actively participate in local decision-making processes.

He said, “The people are given the capacity and power to decide instead of maghintay lang (simply waiting).”

He described how Kalahi-CIDSS has taught the residents that their involvement is important, saying, “It influenced their way of life. The people became assertive because they know what is best for themselves more than anyone else does.”

Mayor Alvarez concluded, “Kalahi-CIDSS taught them to dream again.”

From being a fourth-class municipality in 2001, it has since been re-classified as a second-class municipality in 2009, the change of which is Mayor Alvarez attributes partly due to the interventions introduced by Kalahi-CIDSS.

Since the start of the partnership between Kalahi-CIDSS and Ajuy, 115 community sub-projects were constructed in the municipality, all of which address needs for basic services. These small-scale infrastructures include school buildings, day care centers, health stations, and water systems.

When asked if Ajuy can stand even when Kalahi-CIDSS pulls out of the municipality, the residents were one in saying that they can, because they have already embraced the CDD strategy and will work doubly hard to ensure that they will continue following the processes instituted by the Project.

According to them, disasters will not keep them from working together as a community. On the contrary, CDD helped them respond to the problems better, because they were able to help each other in the recovery operations in the aftermath of “Yolanda”.

One volunteer sums up appreciation with CDD, saying, “Na-in love na kami sa Kalahi-CIDSS (We fell in love with Kalahi-CIDSS).” ###

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Fight child sexual abuse and commercial sexual exploitation – DSWD

“I am looking forward to the day that we will no longer have activities like this because there will be no more victims of child sexual abuse. So my plea to everyone is that we should all be vigilant and united against the fight against child-sexual-abuse and commercial child exploitation.”

This was the message of Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano- Soliman during the Sunset Walk for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation on February 15 at the Quezon Memorial Circle.

The Walk culminated the celebration of the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation on February 8 to 15, with the theme, “Proteksyon ng Bata…Tungkulin ng Bawat Isa”. 

DSWD has served a total of 150 cases of child pornography and cyber pornography from 2010 to 2013.

They were provided with protective custody, psychosocial, legal, financial, educational and spiritual services.

Recently, the Terres de Hommes Netherlands exploratory study on the background and psychosocial consequences of web cam tourism in the Philippines reveals that the Philippines’ online child sex tourism trade is flourishing.

According to the study, this phenomenon remained undiscovered until 2011 when the country successfully prosecuted its first case against a Swedish national and three Filipinos.

Aside from the Sunset Walk, other activities conducted during the week-long event  were Fun and Learning Day with Children organized by End Child Prostitution Child Pornography and the Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes (ECPAT Philippines) and Ateneo-TUGON and a Policy Forum on Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation in the Cyberspace.

Based on Proclamation No. 731, series of 1996, the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation is led by the Council for the Welfare of Children, an attached agency of the DSWD mandated to coordinate the implementation and enforcement of all laws, and to formulate, monitor and evaluate policies, programs and measures for children. ###

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Fight child sexual abuse and commercial sexual exploitation – DSWD

Sec. Soliman enjoins all sectors to join hands to fight child sexual abuse and commercial sexual exploitation during the culminating activity of the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation held at the Quezon Memorial Circle on February 15. (Right) Child performers dramatize the plight of sexually abused and exploited children.

Sec. Soliman enjoins all sectors to join hands to fight child sexual abuse and commercial sexual exploitation during the culminating activity of the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation held at the Quezon Memorial Circle on February 15. (Right) Child performers dramatize the plight of sexually abused and exploited children.

“I am looking forward to the day that we will no longer have activities like this because there will be no more victims of child sexual abuse. So my plea to everyone is that we should all be vigilant and united against the fight against child-sexual-abuse and commercial child exploitation.”

This was the message of Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano- Soliman during the Sunset Walk for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation on February 15 at the Quezon Memorial Circle.

The Walk culminated the celebration of the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation on February 8 to 15, with the theme, “Proteksyon ng Bata…Tungkulin ng Bawat Isa”. 

DSWD has served a total of 150 cases of child pornography and cyber pornography from 2010 to 2013.

They were provided with protective custody, psychosocial, legal, financial, educational and spiritual services.

Recently, the Terres de Hommes Netherlands exploratory study on the background and psychosocial consequences of web cam tourism in the Philippines reveals that the Philippines’ online child sex tourism trade is flourishing.

According to the study, this phenomenon remained undiscovered until 2011 when the country successfully prosecuted its first case against a Swedish national and three Filipinos.

Aside from the Sunset Walk, other activities conducted during the week-long event  were Fun and Learning Day with Children organized by End Child Prostitution Child Pornography and the Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes (ECPAT Philippines) and Ateneo-TUGON and a Policy Forum on Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation in the Cyberspace.

Based on Proclamation No. 731, series of 1996, the 18th National Awareness Week for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation is led by the Council for the Welfare of Children, an attached agency of the DSWD mandated to coordinate the implementation and enforcement of all laws, and to formulate, monitor and evaluate policies, programs and measures for children. ###

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1,455 Yolanda families now in bunkhouses in E. Visayas

Department of Social Welfare and Development Secretary (DSWD) Corazon Juliano-Soliman announced today that 1,455 family-survivors of Yolanda have already transferred to 60 bunkhouses built by the government in Eastern Visayas.

Of these, 222 families are in Tacloban City; 81 families in Palo, Leyte; 429 families in Ormoc City; 50 families in Basey, Samar; and, 673 families in Eastern Samar.

“DSWD continues to coordinate its efforts on shelter with other government agencies, local government units and non-government organisations,” Sec. Soliman said.

Sec. Soliman emphasized that houses identified to be within 40 meters from the shoreline will no longer be allowed to be rebuilt in the same area.

Ermelita Ibabao, 39, a mother of two from Calubian, Barangay 88, said she is very grateful that they received a unit in the bunkhouse.

“Mas maayos po ang kalagayan namin dito sa bunkhouse kumpara sa tents na pinanggalingan namin pagkatapos ng ‘Yolanda’.  Unti-unting umaayos din po ang buhay namin dito,” Ermelita said.

According to Ermilita, they have received food packs and other non-food items before they transferred to the bunkhouse. ###

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100 days after ‘Yolanda’: Sec. Soliman notes high hopes of survivors

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman commends survivors of Typhoon Yolanda for keeping their spirits high to rise from the devastating effects of the disaster 100 days after.

“Your resiliency is indeed contagious, inspiring various groups to continue with their humanitarian assistance to ensure that you will get back on your feet soon,” Sec. Soliman said.

The Secretary, at the same time, thanked all local and international humanitarian groups for their continued support saying, “We could have not done it without you.”

100 days of aid

Sec. Soliman said that in a span of 100 days,  DSWD was able to to distribute  a total of  4,320,824 food packs with equivalent 3-kg or 6-kg rice and 395,108 food packs with 25-kg rice to the 1,472,251 affected families in Visayas,  Regions IV-B, V, and CARAGA which were hardest hit by “Yolanda”.

Of the total, 3.5 million packs were distributed in affected cities and municipalities in Eastern Visayas.

DSWD will continue to distribute relief packs until end of March, after which it will meet with concerned local government units (LGUs)  to determine families who need further relief assistance.

Aside from relief distribution, DSWD is implementing Cash-for-Work (CFW) for household heads who are given cash in exchange for doing community work along disaster operations, cleaning up, and rehabilitation.

From November 9, 2013 to February 10, 2014 some 17,105 individuals already benefited from the CFW program in Eastern Visayas. 

Activities included loading, unloading, and repacking of relief goods; food preparation; sorting and inventory of damaged property, supplies, documents, and equipment; clearing of debris, coastal clean-up, canal dredging; and, communal gardening.

Each beneficiary can work for a maximum of 10 days at P245 per day in municipalities and P260 in cities, based on regional wage rate.

Likewise, downloading of  funds to 46 LGUs which already submitted proposals for implementation of CFW for rebuilding of livelihood assets in their respective municipalities are in process.

In Western Visayas, 300 household heads from Aklan, Capiz, and Iloilo have completed their CFW while around 2,200 are still undertaking rehabilitation work.

To provide a more sustainable livelihood for the survivors, DSWD-FO VI  is conducting a  post-typhoon resource assessment in 12 barangays in Libacao, Aklan for prime abaca producers

In Central Visayas, specifically in Northern Cebu,  18,969 beneficiaries were given CFW. 

Housing

On ensuring that families rendered homeless were given temporary dwelling places, DSWD has taken the lead in the transfer of these families to the transitional houses or bunkhouses constructed by the government.

In Eastern Visayas,  a total of 1,455 families who were temporarily living in tents and makeshift houses in “no-build zones” have already transferred to 60 completed bunkhouses in Leyte, Eastern Samar, and Samar.

Displaced families from Central Visayas are staying in bunkhouses in Estancia. 

On the other hand, those who opted to repair their partially damaged houses were given shelter kits composed of assorted construction materials.

Tarpaulin, construction materials, and tools are also being distributed by international humanitarian organizations such as International Organization of Migration (IOM).

Corrugated Galvanized Iron (CGI) sheets were provided by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). DSWD coordinated their delivery and ensured that the community and beneficiaries were prepared and given access card prior to delivery.

A total of 7,491 families from Guiuan, Palo, and Tanauan in Eastern Visayas have received shelter kits.

Around 2,936,830 CGI sheets will be distributed to 227,040 families in Leyte, Eastern Samar, and Samar.

Onward

As assisting ‘Yolanda’ survivors entered its 100th day yesterday, DSWD will continue with its plans to reach out to the affected families which include relief distribution for vulnerable families, livelihood assistance, social protection for women and children, and rebuilding of community livelihood assets, among others

“After 100 days, we recognize that much still remains to be done to realize the full recovery and rehabilitation of ‘Yolanda’ survivors, but with everyone doing their part, it will not take long,” Sec. Soliman concluded. ###

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DSWD launches Adoption Consciousness Week

The Department of Social Welfare and Development launched over the weekend the observance of Adoption Consciousness Week by setting-up Help Desks in selected SM and Ayala Malls to provide information on adoption to interested individuals and families.
The Help Desks are manned by social workers from DSWD Central Office, Field Offices IV-A, IV-B, and National Capital Region, as well as accredited child-placing agencies, such as Norfil Foundation Inc. and Kaisahang Buhay Foundation (KBF). Information about adoption including the processes, requirements, and its benefits and effects are discussed here.

Prospective adoptive couples may visit the following malls on February 15, 16, 22 and 23: SM City Manila, SM City Fairview, SM City Marikina, SM City Southmall, SM Megamall, Market Market Mall, Glorietta and Greenbelt.

With this year’s theme, “Legal na Pag-aampon sa Lahat ng Pagkakataon,” the awareness week aims to highlight the importance of adhering to the legal adoption process in every situation, including during disasters. ###

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DSWD launches Adoption Consciousness Week

Social workers from DSWD attend to queries of a prospective adoptive couple.

Social workers from DSWD attend to queries of a prospective adoptive couple.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development launched over the weekend the observance of Adoption Consciousness Week by setting-up Help Desks in selected SM and Ayala Malls to provide information on adoption to interested individuals and families.
The Help Desks are manned by social workers from DSWD Central Office, Field Offices IV-A, IV-B, and National Capital Region, as well as accredited child-placing agencies, such as Norfil Foundation Inc. and Kaisahang Buhay Foundation (KBF). Information about adoption including the processes, requirements, and its benefits and effects are discussed here.

Prospective adoptive couples may visit the following malls on February 15, 16, 22 and 23: SM City Manila, SM City Fairview, SM City Marikina, SM City Southmall, SM Megamall, Market Market Mall, Glorietta and Greenbelt.

With this year’s theme, “Legal na Pag-aampon sa Lahat ng Pagkakataon,” the awareness week aims to highlight the importance of adhering to the legal adoption process in every situation, including during disasters. ###

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DSWD sees rise of fathers active in home and community

Anda, Pangasinan — The role of fathers in the nurturing of children is as important as that of mothers.

It has been a misconception among Filipino fathers that their wives should be the primary caregiver and nurturer of their children while they provide for the family’s needs.

On the other hand, with the global economic slowdown, many mothers are constrained to work outside the home, hence, the support of fathers in the rearing of children has become even more significant.

To address this evolving situation of Filipino families, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has initiated the program Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities (ERPAT) to strengthen fathers’ parenting skills.

ERPAT gives importance to the development and enrichment of knowledge, attitude, and skills of fathers in performing their paternal roles and responsibilities.

 “Father-transformers”

 In this town, the ERPAT program has shown positive results in solidifying families.

Around 30 fathers have become more active in nurturing their families after  attending an ERPAT training which discussed topics such as Role of Fathers, Raising and Understanding Needs of Children, and Understanding Differences Between Men and Women, among others.

One of the ERPAT-trained fathers,  Pastor Rogelio Valdez, said, “We like being taught how to love our wives more and understand our children better.”

“Aside from becoming more caring to their families, they also became more active in their communities,” noted Municipal Social Welfare and Development Officer Jowey Celso.

“They call themselves ‘transformers,’ which they started in their own families,” Celso added.

Celso leads the group in their monthly meetings where they share experiences in molding their own families and in becoming role models in their own communities.

A challenge to change

As change agents in their own families and communities, the trained ERPAT dads also pushed for the creation of a Municipal Ordinance on Moral Recovery Program.

Under this, an ERPAT-trained father is assigned  in every  barangay as ‘spiritual leader’ joining the barangay officials in their meetings and activities.

The empowered fathers envision themselves contributing to community development as a whole.

“Pag matino ang tatay, mapapatino ang buong pamilya, at pag matino ang pamilya, mapapatino ang buong komunidad (If a father is well-mannered, the whole family becomes well-mannered. And if the families are well-mannered, the whole community too becomes well-mannered),” Celso emphasized. ###

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Summary of Foreign and Local Donations
As of November 21, 2014 (8:00AM)

P98,504,441.87 - Local Donations

USD23,784,482.78 - Foreign Donations


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