Evacuation centers are down to 35

shown in this photo are tents provided to the evacuees at the grandstand

shown in this photo are tents provided to the evacuees at the grandstand

Zamboanga City, September 23 – Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman today announced that the number of evacuation centers is reduced to 35.

According to Secretary Soliman, from 57 evacuation centers being managed and assisted by Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), it went down to 35 centers with 18,112 families or 94,753 individuals. “The decrease was due to the merging of some evacuation centers with small number of evacuees.  However, families are continually being provided with relief goods,” Secretary Soliman added.

The grandstand evacuation center remains to have the highest number of evacuees with 11,979 families or 71,265 families.

As of press time, DSWD already allocated a total of P74,898,048 million for combined food and non-food items, financial assistance, and cash for work.

Earlier this week, DSWD intensified its monitoring to these evacuation centers in coordination with the Archdiocese of Zamboanga and the City Government to ensure better management and supervision of these centers.

While the City Government and Archdiocese are supervising some areas, provision is still being ensured by DSWD.

The ‘Home-based or community-based evacuees refers to those families who sought temporary shelters with relatives and friends that being attended by the department through the City Social Welfare and Development (CSWD) district offices.  Seven district offices serve as registration centers for community-based evacuees.

To date, there are 3,712 families or 10,194 individuals have registered as community-based evacuees. Per DSWD statistics, the total combined affected families in the evacuation centers and in the community-based was reduced to 23,513 or 117,182 individuals who were affected by the armed-conflict since September 9. ###

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Amid violence, children find a haven at DSWD’s Special Day Care Center

Student volunteers join the children in a sing and dance activity at the Special Day Care Tent at the Grandstand.

Student volunteers join the children in a sing and dance activity at the Special Day Care Tent at the Grandstand.

Ekong, not his real name, an 8-year old evacuee from barangay Sta. Catalina can still vividly recall how his parents managed to leave their house.  All he could hear were deafening sounds of gunshots, bombs, and scream of their neighbors in that fateful day.

“I just followed my parents. We continued running until we reached a place where we found a public transportation that drove us away from the chaos,” Ekong astoundingly recounted.

That was how Ekong described his experience on the first day of the armed conflict between government troops and the Moro National Liberation Front-Misuari faction.

Two weeks after, Ekong can still recount his fearful experience, but his smiles when asked about the ordeal that he went through is a complete manifestation that he has somehow recovered from the trauma.

When asked what he misses back home, he was quick to say, he misses school.

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Dinky Soliman attributes Ekong’s improved behavior to children’s resiliency.

“Children are resilient. They can readily cope with and bounce back faster than adults to crisis situation such as this.  It is also important to follow through their coping mechanism with activities that can help them fully recover,” Secretary Soliman said.

Secretary Soliman cited the setting up of the Special Day Care Center at the Joaquin Enriquez, Sports Complex or Grandstand, the biggest evacuation center in the city, as an important step to help children cope with their trauma.

At the Special Day Care Center, Ekong and other children-evacuees found a temporary place where they can stay, play, and learn.  It is where social workers gather children-evacuees to undergo psychosocial intervention through singing, dancing, storytelling, and arts.

“Even in a crisis situation, we at the DSWD continue to implement the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD). Since these kids are displaced, they can no longer attend day care center or school in a normal situation, but it is important to continue their learning,” said Greta Martinez, coordinator of DSWD’s Special Day Care Center at the Grandstand.

With her is DSWD Region IX’s Day Care Accreditor Winston Orong, who sees this opportunity as an avenue for children to lessen or to completely heal the trauma brought by the armed conflict. “This is a special place for children where they learn, have fun, and at the same time forget the negative experiences they went through,” said Orong.

The Special Day Care Center caters to children 3 to 12 years old. The class is divided into two groups. First group is composed of children 3-6 years old while children 7-12 years old comprise the second group. Both groups are looked after and taught by volunteer-students and teachers.

Ekong is part of the second group. He feels like he is in a regular school because at the Special Day Care Center, he also writes, reads, draws, and plays with his friends.

Meanwhile, a nursing student from Western Mindanao State University Jayvee Ampo expressed how fulfilling it is for him to be of service to the children. “Ten days are very overwhelming and heartwarming. So happy at least you get to see them smile, sing, dance without fear and worries,” said Ampo.

Neliza Guililan, a pre-school teacher from Bethany School, shared that the Special Day Care Center at the evacuation center provides an opportunity for the children to understand the importance of education. “I commend this effort of the DSWD in putting up care centers for children in the evacuation center because this gives them (children) a continuous relief to the trauma they suffered in the armed conflict,” Guililan further explained.

“Some of them are not attending school back in their community, so through DSWD’s Special Day Care Center, they get to experience how it is to be in school, or how it is to be with other kids learning and listening to a teacher. We do nott only teach them here he basics, but we also teach them the proper hygiene since it is vital for children to observe cleanliness all the time,” said Guililan.

Despite missing his school, Ekong said he is happy with his newfound friends.  Young as he is, Ekong fully understands the chaos around him, his family is in a safe place where he and his siblings can walk around, play, and somehow, live normally.  ###

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Amid violence, children find a haven at DSWD’s Special Day Care Center

Student volunteers join the children in a sing and dance activity at the Special Day Care Tent at the Grandstand.

Student volunteers join the children in a sing and dance activity at the Special Day Care Tent at the Grandstand.

Ekong, not his real name, an 8-year old evacuee from barangay Sta. Catalina can still vividly recall how his parents managed to leave their house.  All he could hear were deafening sounds of gunshots, bombs, and scream of their neighbors in that fateful day.

“I just followed my parents. We continued running until we reached a place where we found a public transportation that drove us away from the chaos,” Ekong astoundingly recounted.

That was how Ekong described his experience on the first day of the armed conflict between government troops and the Moro National Liberation Front-Misuari faction.

Two weeks after, Ekong can still recount his fearful experience, but his smiles when asked about the ordeal that he went through is a complete manifestation that he has somehow recovered from the trauma.

When asked what he misses back home, he was quick to say, he misses school.

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Dinky Soliman attributes Ekong’s improved behavior to children’s resiliency.

“Children are resilient. They can readily cope with and bounce back faster than adults to crisis situation such as this.  It is also important to follow through their coping mechanism with activities that can help them fully recover,” Secretary Soliman said.

Secretary Soliman cited the setting up of the Special Day Care Center at the Joaquin Enriquez, Sports Complex or Grandstand, the biggest evacuation center in the city, as an important step to help children cope with their trauma.

At the Special Day Care Center, Ekong and other children-evacuees found a temporary place where they can stay, play, and learn.  It is where social workers gather children-evacuees to undergo psychosocial intervention through singing, dancing, storytelling, and arts.

“Even in a crisis situation, we at the DSWD continue to implement the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD). Since these kids are displaced, they can no longer attend day care center or school in a normal situation, but it is important to continue their learning,” said Greta Martinez, coordinator of DSWD’s Special Day Care Center at the Grandstand.

With her is DSWD Region IX’s Day Care Accreditor Winston Orong, who sees this opportunity as an avenue for children to lessen or to completely heal the trauma brought by the armed conflict. “This is a special place for children where they learn, have fun, and at the same time forget the negative experiences they went through,” said Orong.

The Special Day Care Center caters to children 3 to 12 years old. The class is divided into two groups. First group is composed of children 3-6 years old while children 7-12 years old comprise the second group. Both groups are looked after and taught by volunteer-students and teachers.

Ekong is part of the second group. He feels like he is in a regular school because at the Special Day Care Center, he also writes, reads, draws, and plays with his friends.

Meanwhile, a nursing student from Western Mindanao State University Jayvee Ampo expressed how fulfilling it is for him to be of service to the children. “Ten days are very overwhelming and heartwarming. So happy at least you get to see them smile, sing, dance without fear and worries,” said Ampo.

Neliza Guililan, a pre-school teacher from Bethany School, shared that the Special Day Care Center at the evacuation center provides an opportunity for the children to understand the importance of education. “I commend this effort of the DSWD in putting up care centers for children in the evacuation center because this gives them (children) a continuous relief to the trauma they suffered in the armed conflict,” Guililan further explained.

“Some of them are not attending school back in their community, so through DSWD’s Special Day Care Center, they get to experience how it is to be in school, or how it is to be with other kids learning and listening to a teacher. We do nott only teach them here he basics, but we also teach them the proper hygiene since it is vital for children to observe cleanliness all the time,” said Guililan.

Despite missing his school, Ekong said he is happy with his newfound friends.  Young as he is, Ekong fully understands the chaos around him, his family is in a safe place where he and his siblings can walk around, play, and somehow, live normally.  ###

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DSWD to earmark P3.9B for Zambo rehabilitation

Families affected by MNLF-led crisis in Zamboanga City occupying at the Grandstand. As of today, the number of individuals occupying in 36 evacuations centers is reduced to 111,983.

Families affected by MNLF-led crisis in Zamboanga City occupying at the Grandstand. As of today, the number of individuals occupying in 36 evacuations centers is reduced to 111,983.

Zamboanga City, September 22 — Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman today announced that the government through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) will earmark a total of P3.9B for the early recovery and rehabilitation of those families affected by the ruthless Moro National Liberation Front-led crisis in Zamboanga City.

Secretary Soliman, who is on her 12th day stint in Zambanga City to oversee the continuing relief operations of the Department, emphasized that rehabilitation efforts are now being planned out by the DSWD in coordination with the Crisis Management Committee headed by Zamboanga City Mayor Beng Climaco.

According to Secretary Soliman, the rehabilitation efforts will immediately commence once the city government of Zamboanga identifies the areas. “This is a huge challenge to us but the government is making sure that the early recovery and rehabilitation efforts are well organized and systematized,” she added.

“We will make sure that we will build back better communities for the affected families,” Secretary Soliman emphasized.

The rehabilitation plan for the victims of armed conflict in Zamboanga includes the continuing relief assistance for one month, balik-probinsiya program by providing the evacuees with transportation and incidental assistance, educational assistance to college students, supplementary feeding for children, cash-for-work program, construction of temporary and permanent shelters, and livelihood assistance.

 

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DSWD to earmark P3.9B for Zambo rehabilitation

Families affected by MNLF-led crisis in Zamboanga City occupying at the Grandstand. As of today, the number of individuals occupying in 36 evacuations centers is reduced to 111,983.

Families affected by MNLF-led crisis in Zamboanga City occupying at the Grandstand. As of today, the number of individuals occupying in 36 evacuations centers is reduced to 111,983.

Zamboanga City, September 22 — Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman today announced that the government through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) will earmark a total of P3.9B for the early recovery and rehabilitation of those families affected by the ruthless Moro National Liberation Front-led crisis in Zamboanga City.

Secretary Soliman, who is on her 12th day stint in Zambanga City to oversee the continuing relief operations of the Department, emphasized that rehabilitation efforts are now being planned out by the DSWD in coordination with the Crisis Management Committee headed by Zamboanga City Mayor Beng Climaco.

According to Secretary Soliman, the rehabilitation efforts will immediately commence once the city government of Zamboanga identifies the areas. “This is a huge challenge to us but the government is making sure that the early recovery and rehabilitation efforts are well organized and systematized,” she added.

“We will make sure that we will build back better communities for the affected families,” Secretary Soliman emphasized.

The rehabilitation plan for the victims of armed conflict in Zamboanga includes the continuing relief assistance for one month, balik-probinsiya program by providing the evacuees with transportation and incidental assistance, educational assistance to college students, supplementary feeding for children, cash-for-work program, construction of temporary and permanent shelters, and livelihood assistance.

 

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More relief goods arrive in Zamboanga City

(Left Photo) DSWD Secretary Soliman inspects the goods contained at a PCG vessel (Corregidor 891) which arrived at the Zambo. City wharf yesterday morning. (Right Photo) A truckload of high-energy biscuits being delivered to the DSWD Operations Center. These biscuits are distributed to children in day care centers to supplement their daily intake.

(Left Photo) DSWD Secretary Soliman inspects the goods contained at a PCG vessel (Corregidor 891) which arrived at the Zambo. City wharf yesterday morning. (Right Photo) A truckload of high-energy biscuits being delivered to the DSWD Operations Center. These biscuits are distributed to children in day care centers to supplement their daily intake.

Zamboanga City, September 22 – Two Philippine Coast Guard ships arrived in this city yesterday bringing in additional relief goods from the National Resource Operations Center (NROC) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) for the families affected by the crisis in the area.

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman inspected the items at the local wharf and instructed for its transfer to the warehouses for repacking.

The BRP EDSA, the first ship to arrive under the command of Lt. Col. Joe Mark Angge, contained relief goods of 17,500 family food packs and 400 boxes of high-energy biscuits.

The second ship Corregidor 892, under Lcdr. Ludovico Librilla, Commanding Officer, carried relief goods comprising 650 family packs, 4,000 family kits that include cooking and eating utensils, 1,000 pieces of blankets, 1,000 pieces of mats, 1,000 pieces of mosquito nets, and 380 tents.

Relief goods from USAID

 

(Center) DSWD Sec. Dinky thanks USAID through their Area Team Leader Ainee Amboy (right) for the three truckloads of relief goods donated by USAID that were brought to the DPWH warehouse for repacking.

(Center) DSWD Sec. Dinky thanks USAID through their Area Team Leader Ainee Amboy (right) for the three truckloads of relief goods donated by USAID that were brought to the DPWH warehouse for repacking.

Meanwhile, Secretary Soliman also met with the officials of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) at the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) compound yesterday morning, to officially receive relief goods for the evacuees.

Ms. Ainee Amboy, USAID Area Team Leader for Mindanao, turned over to the DSWD three truckloads of non-food items (NFI) containing hygiene kits, sleeping gears, and kitchen items.  The donations, as accounted by the DSWD, comprised of 10,000 pieces of bath soap, 10,000 pieces of towels, 10,000 pieces of laundry soaps, 5,000 tubes of toothpaste, 25,000 pieces of toothbrush, 5,000 bottles of alcohol, 9,710 pieces of blankets, 5,000 pieces of sleeping mats, and kitchen items like ladles, cooking pots, and water basins at 5,000 pieces each.

Secretary Soliman ordered for the immediate repacking of these goods for its timely release to the evacuees by Sept. 23.

“I commend the USAID, other donor agencies, civil society organizations, faith-based groups, and kind-hearted individuals for their continued support extended to our brothers and sisters in Zamboanga who are ruthlessly affected by the crisis instigated by MNLF-Misuari faction,” Secretary Soliman said.  ###

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More relief goods arrive in Zamboanga City

(Left Photo) DSWD Secretary Soliman inspects the goods contained at a PCG vessel (Corregidor 891) which arrived at the Zambo. City wharf yesterday morning. (Right Photo) A truckload of high-energy biscuits being delivered to the DSWD Operations Center.  These biscuits are distributed to children in day care centers to supplement their daily intake.

(Left Photo) DSWD Secretary Soliman inspects the goods contained at a PCG vessel (Corregidor 891) which arrived at the Zambo. City wharf yesterday morning. (Right Photo) A truckload of high-energy biscuits being delivered to the DSWD Operations Center. These biscuits are distributed to children in day care centers to supplement their daily intake.

Zamboanga City, September 22 – Two Philippine Coast Guard ships arrived in this city yesterday bringing in additional relief goods from the National Resource Operations Center (NROC) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) for the families affected by the crisis in the area.

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman inspected the items at the local wharf and instructed for its transfer to the warehouses for repacking.

The BRP EDSA, the first ship to arrive under the command of Lt. Col. Joe Mark Angge, contained relief goods of 17,500 family food packs and 400 boxes of high-energy biscuits.

The second ship Corregidor 892, under Lcdr. Ludovico Librilla, Commanding Officer, carried relief goods comprising 650 family packs, 4,000 family kits that include cooking and eating utensils, 1,000 pieces of blankets, 1,000 pieces of mats, 1,000 pieces of mosquito nets, and 380 tents.

Relief goods from USAID

(Center) DSWD Sec. Dinky thanks USAID through their Area Team Leader Ainee Amboy (right) for the three truckloads of relief goods donated by USAID that were brought to the DPWH warehouse for repacking.

(Center) DSWD Sec. Dinky thanks USAID through their Area Team Leader Ainee Amboy (right) for the three truckloads of relief goods donated by USAID that were brought to the DPWH warehouse for repacking.

Meanwhile, Secretary Soliman also met with the officials of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) at the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) compound yesterday morning, to officially receive relief goods for the evacuees.

Ms. Ainee Amboy, USAID Area Team Leader for Mindanao, turned over to the DSWD three truckloads of non-food items (NFI) containing hygiene kits, sleeping gears, and kitchen items.  The donations, as accounted by the DSWD, comprised of 10,000 pieces of bath soap, 10,000 pieces of towels, 10,000 pieces of laundry soaps, 5,000 tubes of toothpaste, 25,000 pieces of toothbrush, 5,000 bottles of alcohol, 9,710 pieces of blankets, 5,000 pieces of sleeping mats, and kitchen items like ladles, cooking pots, and water basins at 5,000 pieces each.

Secretary Soliman ordered for the immediate repacking of these goods for its timely release to the evacuees by Sept. 23.

“I commend the USAID, other donor agencies, civil ociety Organizations, faith-based groups, and kind-hearted individuals for their continued support extended to our brothers and sisters in Zamboanga who are ruthlessly affected by the crisis instigated by MNLF-Misuari faction,” Secretary Soliman said.  ###

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Teacher volunteers respond to crisis in Zamboanga City

Children evacuees from Divisoria Elementary School in Brgy. Divisoria, Zamboanga City actively participate in different therapy sessions held in school.

Children evacuees from Divisoria Elementary School in Brgy. Divisoria, Zamboanga City actively participate in different therapy sessions held in school.

The collaboration and coordination of the different government agencies, private organizations, and volunteer groups during the crisis was proven by the kindergarten teachers of Zamboanga City, who showed their unity and dedication to their profession by volunteering to teach, as well as render other services to the children caught in the armed conflict.

According to DSWD Secretary Dinky Soliman, the volunteers play a big role in the current crisis in Zamboanga, helping in different ways, such as helping in the evacuation centers, food distribution, counseling services, medical assistance, and other services to the evacuees.  “The DSWD commends the volunteer workers in providing honest and committed service to the evacuees,” Secretary Soliman said.

Volunteer teachers from different elementary and secondary schools in Zamboanga City.

Volunteer teachers from different elementary and secondary schools in Zamboanga City.

The 30 volunteer teachers from Baliwasan Central School, Labuan Central School, Southern Support Command School, San Jose Gusu Elementary School, Maasin Elementary School, Don Gems School, Sargali Elementary School, Victoria Elementary School, Presa Elementary School, Sta. Barbara Elementary School, Curuan Elementary School at Mangga Elementary School, are holding special classes from September 20-21 for the children currently in Divisoria

Elementary School, one of the designated evacuation centers of the City Government.

Some 71 affected families with 360 persons are temporarily staying at Division Elementary School. They came from Barangays Sta. Catalina (47 families), Mampang (16 families) and Talon-talon (8 families).

According to Kimraza Irene S. Hadjirul, kindergarten teacher of Balisawan Central School, “it’s a big help to the children when they undergo activities that will lessen or make them forget the trauma they have experienced, as teachers we know that these children have been through painful and difficult experiences, just like their parents,” says Kimraza.

More than 100 children aged from 3 to 12 years old divided into two groups – (3-7 years old and 8-12 years old) in the evacuation center availed of story telling session, film showing, feeding program,  and other activities including painting, writing, reading, and artwork.

Free haircutting services to children-evacuees provided by volunteer hairdressers in the city.

Free haircutting services to children-evacuees provided by volunteer hairdressers in the city.

Free hair cutting sessions were also offered to evacuees at Division Elementary School. Three haircutters volunteered their services.

‘Oplan linis’ is being conducted at the evacuation center wherein children will be taught proper hygiene. They will also be provided with toothbrushes and toothpastes.

The activity culminates today with the teachers turning over the donations, which they have personally collected.

Sherwin Aputin, a teacher said, “We will continue to conduct these activities in other evacuation centers as needed. This is our way of helping the government through our collaboration with the DSWD.” # ##

 

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