DSWD leads ‘Balik sa Bayan’ program for ‘Yolanda’ evacuees

An inter-agency group led by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has offered a package of services to Typhoon Yolanda survivors who temporarily sought refuge in Metro Manila and nearby provinces but are now ready to go back to their respective hometowns in Eastern Visayas.

Dubbed “Balik sa Bayan,” the beneficiaries are provided with financial assistance, transportation assistance, and health services. They are also given pabaon packs containing relief goods, blankets, and mats; shelter kits with construction materials and basic carpentry tools; starter kits; and, a mobile phone.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that the program aims to assist the survivors in their early recovery and reintegration to their respective communities.

Currently being processed for the assistance are those who were temporarily housed at the different facilities managed by the DSWD, local government units (LGUs), and non-government organizations, and those who can no longer be accommodated by their relatives due to their limited resources.

As of January 23, a total of 77 families composed of 212 individuals who were accommodated at the DSWD-managed Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong City and at the Tent City in Pasay City have been sent home.Other agencies working on the implementation of the program are Department of Health (DOH), National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC), Philippine Air Force (PAF), Salubong Movement, PLDT-Smart Foundation, and the different LGUs. ###

Posted in FeaturedComments Off

DSWD leads ‘Balik sa Bayan’ program for ‘Yolanda’ evacuees

cfwpicAn inter-agency group led by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has offered a package of services to Typhoon Yolanda survivors who temporarily sought refuge in Metro Manila and nearby provinces but are now ready to go back to their respective hometowns in Eastern Visayas.

Dubbed “Balik sa Bayan,” the beneficiaries are provided with financial assistance, transportation assistance, and health services. They are also given pabaon packs containing relief goods, blankets, and mats; shelter kits with construction materials and basic carpentry tools; starter kits; and, a mobile phone.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that the program aims to assist the survivors in their early recovery and reintegration to their respective communities.

Currently being processed for the assistance are those who were temporarily housed at the different facilities managed by the DSWD, local government units (LGUs), and non-government organizations, and those who can no longer be accommodated by their relatives due to their limited resources.

As of January 23, a total of 77 families composed of 212 individuals who were accommodated at the DSWD-managed Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong City and at the Tent City in Pasay City have been sent home.Other agencies working on the implementation of the program are Department of Health (DOH), National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC), Philippine Air Force (PAF), Salubong Movement, PLDT-Smart Foundation, and the different LGUs. ###

Posted in NewsComments Off

Sec. Soliman tours US Sen. Rubio around DSWD relief hub

Tacloban City, Leyte – Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman showed and briefed United States Senator Marco Rubio on the various phases of disaster and warehouse operations in the DSWD Relief Hub during his visit to this city on Wednesday.

Sec. Soliman said that as of January 22, DSWD has already distributed a total of 3,371,844 food packs and rice packs, 462,121 liters of water, 126,253 canned goods, and 245,444 high energy biscuits to ‘Yolanda’ victims in Eastern Visayas.

She explained that food distribution will not be terminated in March.

However, DSWD and concerned local government units will conduct a joint assessment by end of March to determine the number of families who are able to stand on their own and those who need continued assistance. ###

Posted in FeaturedComments Off

Sec. Soliman tours US Sen. Rubio around DSWD relief hub

US SenatorTacloban City, Leyte – Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman showed and briefed United States Senator Marco Rubio on the various phases of disaster and warehouse operations in the DSWD Relief Hub during his visit to this city on Wednesday.

Sec. Soliman said that as of January 22, DSWD has already distributed a total of 3,371,844 food packs and rice packs, 462,121 liters of water, 126,253 canned goods, and 245,444 high energy biscuits to ‘Yolanda’ victims in Eastern Visayas.

She explained that food distribution will not be terminated in March.

However, DSWD and concerned local government units will conduct a joint assessment by end of March to determine the number of families who are able to stand on their own and those who need continued assistance. ###

Posted in NewsComments Off

DSWD holds online learning exchange on disaster response with Indonesia

DSWD officials and staff attentively listen as Mr. Victor Bottini (on screen in white) provides the context of the natural disasters that struck Indonesia.

To gain more insights on how the disaster relief and recovery efforts were undertaken in the aftermath of the 2004 Aceh Tsunami in Indonesia, select officials and employees of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) held on Tuesday a video conference with key individuals in Indonesia who were part of the overall disaster response.

Experts consider the Aceh post-disaster relief and recovery operations as the biggest humanitarian effort and reconstruction project in developing countries to date.

The learning exchange, which was organized through the partnership of DSWD and Asian Development Bank (ADB), focused on the Aceh experience in disaster response operations, particularly in the light of the Philippines’ own efforts following the recent calamities that hit the country, including Typhoon Yolanda.

The video conference was meant to provide the DSWD with insights on the use of the Community-Driven Development (CDD) approach, which is the strategy used by  DSWD’s Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) in disaster response.

CDD is a development strategy that focuses on empowering and building up the capacities of citizens and local government units so they will be able to lift their own communities out of poverty.

Kalahi-CIDSS is one of the three core poverty alleviation programs of the Department, alongside the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program and the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

Participation of ordinary citizens

DSWD Assistant Secretary and Kalahi-CIDSS Deputy National Project Director Camilo Gudmalin, who himself worked in Aceh’s disaster operations, said that the most notable characteristic of Indonesia’s experience was how the ordinary citizens became active participants in reconstruction efforts.

He said, “The communities came together to participate in identifying their problems, even in a disaster situation”.

This was affirmed by Victor Bottini, a social development specialist who served as the World Bank Resident Representative  in Aceh at the time of the tsunami and who headed the four-person team in Indonesia at the video conference.

Bottini said that they chose the CDD approach as the strategy in their operations because it is the citizens themselves who were strongly affected by the tsunami.

“It’s because we’re concerned about people, not just infrastructure,” he said.

He explained that CDD makes disaster response easier because community mobilization ensures that the needs of calamity victims are met and they will also be trained to become better prepared in case of future disasters.

He went on to explain that one of the benefits of the CDD approach in disaster response is the increase in readiness of the citizens. Through CDD, people are mobilized, which in turn allows them to work together even in trying circumstances.

Bottini added, “You have a [ready] network before and after  a disaster. You do not have to set up a system when the disaster hits, because it is already there.”

Asec. Gudmalin enjoined the participants of the video conference to follow Indonesia’s path of “building back better”.

Bottini advised the participants to make Kalahi-CIDSS and other CDD programs take an active part in disaster response to make communities involved in the recovery process, as this will help them return to normalcy.

Bottini shared that following the Aceh experience, he and the other implementers realized that those who worked in CDD activities had more ownership of the projects they implemented compared to those who used non-CDD strategies, because they were the ones who actively worked to accomplish these.

Asec. Gudmalin previously headed the disaster relief operations of the DSWD. He handled the Department’s operations, including but not limited to Typhoon Yolanda, the Zamboanga City armed conflict, and the September earthquake that shook the Visayas region.

National CDD program

This learning exchange is not DSWD’s first involvement with Indonesia.

The design of Kalahi-CIDSS, which was established in 2003, derived its design from Indonesia’s Kecamatan Development Program (KDP), the pioneering CDD program at that time. KDP has since evolved into a national program, the  Program Nasional Pemberdayaan Masyarakat (PNPM) Mandiri.

Similarly, the DSWD is now preparing for the National Community-Driven Development Program (NCDDP), the scaling up of Kalahi-CIDSS’ CDD operations nationwide.

The NCDDP will cover more municipalities all over the country and will also involve other national government agencies in its implementation. The program pays special attention to disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM).

Aside from covering the poorest municipalities, NCDDP will also be implemented in Typhoon Yolanda-affected municipalities within its target provinces.

Last month, the ADB committed to provide a $372.1 million emergency loan, which will include coverage of the support of NCDDP’s DRRM component.

Similarly, World Bank pledged $480 million loan for the NCDDP, which may be used for disaster emergency response.

These commitments were made after Typhoon Yolanda hit the Philippines.

Aside from DRRM, the NCDDP will also look into other thematic areas, including gender, conflict, environment protection, and the participation of Indigenous Peoples (IPs). ###

Posted in FeaturedComments Off

DSWD holds online learning exchange on disaster response with Indonesia

DSWD officials and staff attentively listen as Mr. Victor Bottini (on screen in white) provides the context of the natural disasters that struck Indonesia.

DSWD officials and staff attentively listen as Mr. Victor Bottini (on screen in white) provides the context of the natural disasters that struck Indonesia.

To gain more insights on how the disaster relief and recovery efforts were undertaken in the aftermath of the 2004 Aceh Tsunami in Indonesia, select officials and employees of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) held on Tuesday a video conference with key individuals in Indonesia who were part of the overall disaster response.

Experts consider the Aceh post-disaster relief and recovery operations as the biggest humanitarian effort and reconstruction project in developing countries to date.

The learning exchange, which was organized through the partnership of DSWD and Asian Development Bank (ADB), focused on the Aceh experience in disaster response operations, particularly in the light of the Philippines’ own efforts following the recent calamities that hit the country, including Typhoon Yolanda.

The video conference was meant to provide the DSWD with insights on the use of the Community-Driven Development (CDD) approach, which is the strategy used by  DSWD’s Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) in disaster response.

CDD is a development strategy that focuses on empowering and building up the capacities of citizens and local government units so they will be able to lift their own communities out of poverty.

Kalahi-CIDSS is one of the three core poverty alleviation programs of the Department, alongside the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program and the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

Participation of ordinary citizens

DSWD Assistant Secretary and Kalahi-CIDSS Deputy National Project Director Camilo Gudmalin, who himself worked in Aceh’s disaster operations, said that the most notable characteristic of Indonesia’s experience was how the ordinary citizens became active participants in reconstruction efforts.

He said, “The communities came together to participate in identifying their problems, even in a disaster situation”.

This was affirmed by Victor Bottini, a social development specialist who served as the World Bank Resident Representative  in Aceh at the time of the tsunami and who headed the four-person team in Indonesia at the video conference.

Bottini said that they chose the CDD approach as the strategy in their operations because it is the citizens themselves who were strongly affected by the tsunami.

“It’s because we’re concerned about people, not just infrastructure,” he said.

He explained that CDD makes disaster response easier because community mobilization ensures that the needs of calamity victims are met and they will also be trained to become better prepared in case of future disasters.

He went on to explain that one of the benefits of the CDD approach in disaster response is the increase in readiness of the citizens. Through CDD, people are mobilized, which in turn allows them to work together even in trying circumstances.

Bottini added, “You have a [ready] network before and after  a disaster. You do not have to set up a system when the disaster hits, because it is already there.”

Asec. Gudmalin enjoined the participants of the video conference to follow Indonesia’s path of “building back better”.

Bottini advised the participants to make Kalahi-CIDSS and other CDD programs take an active part in disaster response to make communities involved in the recovery process, as this will help them return to normalcy.

Bottini shared that following the Aceh experience, he and the other implementers realized that those who worked in CDD activities had more ownership of the projects they implemented compared to those who used non-CDD strategies, because they were the ones who actively worked to accomplish these.

Asec. Gudmalin previously headed the disaster relief operations of the DSWD. He handled the Department’s operations, including but not limited to Typhoon Yolanda, the Zamboanga City armed conflict, and the September earthquake that shook the Visayas region.

National CDD program

This learning exchange is not DSWD’s first involvement with Indonesia.

The design of Kalahi-CIDSS, which was established in 2003, derived its design from Indonesia’s Kecamatan Development Program (KDP), the pioneering CDD program at that time. KDP has since evolved into a national program, the  Program Nasional Pemberdayaan Masyarakat (PNPM) Mandiri.

Similarly, the DSWD is now preparing for the National Community-Driven Development Program (NCDDP), the scaling up of Kalahi-CIDSS’ CDD operations nationwide.

The NCDDP will cover more municipalities all over the country and will also involve other national government agencies in its implementation. The program pays special attention to disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM).

Aside from covering the poorest municipalities, NCDDP will also be implemented in Typhoon Yolanda-affected municipalities within its target provinces.

Last month, the ADB committed to provide a $372.1 million emergency loan, which will include coverage of the support of NCDDP’s DRRM component.

Similarly, World Bank pledged $480 million loan for the NCDDP, which may be used for disaster emergency response.

These commitments were made after Typhoon Yolanda hit the Philippines.

Aside from DRRM, the NCDDP will also look into other thematic areas, including gender, conflict, environment protection, and the participation of Indigenous Peoples (IPs). ###

Posted in NewsComments Off

Talumpati ng Kagalang-galang Benigno S. Aquino III Pangulo ng Pilipinas Sa ika-63 anibersaryo ng Kagawaran ng Kagalingang Panlipunan at Pagpapaunlad

[Inihayag sa Central Office ng Department of Social Welfare and Development, Lungsod Quezon, noong ika-16 ng Enero 2014]

Secretary Dinky Soliman; Secretary Julia Abad; Asec. Javier Jimenez; ARMM Vice Governor Haroun Alrashid Alonto Lucman Jr.; DSWD awardees, of course, Mr. Danny Bitara and Ms. Noemi Bongaya; officials and staff of the Department of Social Welfare and Development and its attached agencies; fellow workers in government honored guests; mga minamahal ko pong kababayan:

Muli, magandang umaga po sa inyong lahat.

Bago ako sumampa dito sa podium, mula sa ating choir na napakasigla, kayo rin napakasigla n’yo. Parang, napapag-isip akong tumambay muna kami ni Asec Delantar dito para sumigla rin kami.

Huli ho tayong nagkasama-sama sa ganitong pagdiriwang noong ika-60 anibersaryo ng DSWD. Siyempre hindi ko puwedeng palampasin ang pagkakataon na batiin kayo sa pagiging “senior citizen”  ng inyong ahensiya noong 2011. Ngayon naman po, sa dami ng pagsubok na hinarap natin na kayo ang isa sa mga kadamay, lalong importanteng personal kong itanong sa inyo: Kumusta naman ho kayo? [Audience: Mabuti po, sir.]

Hindi naman ho siguro naka-Red Bull lang ‘yung ating choir kanina kaya full of energy.

Alam po ninyo, hanga ako sa inyong mga kawani ng DSWD. Sa sitwasyon ko po kasi, may mga araw na patung-patong na mabigat na suliranin ang kailangan kong harapin; may mga araw rin namang dinaratnan tayo ng naparaming good news na puwede nating ipagmalaki. So may araw na mabigat, may araw na sobrang gaan ng pakiramdam. Ang ibig ko pong sabihin, hindi palaging masamang balita ang natatanggap ko. Sa DSWD, alam ko na para sa marami sa inyo, halos buong-araw, araw-araw, syempre problema ang kaharap ninyo. Nandiyan ang mga tinamaan ng sakuna; ang may dinadalang karamdaman; ang mga biktima ng karahasan. Almusal, tanghalian, hanggang hapunan, at kung minsan ho, pati sa midnight snack mayroon—suliranin ng ating mga kababayan ang parang ulam na ninyo. At hindi lang ito katulad ng suliraning hinarap natin dati, kung saan iilang barangay lang ang kailangan ninyong tutukan. Nitong nagdaang 2013, hinarap natin ang problema sa Zamboanga. Tapos nito, lumindol naman sa Central Visayas. Di nagtagal, sinalanta naman ng bagyong Yolanda ang 44 na probinsya sa buong bansa. Sumingit pa ho si Santi at kanyang monsoon rains. Siyempre, wala pa sa listahang ito ang mga sakuna o hamong hindi masyadong naging laman ng balita—ang pagtugon sa mga tinamaan ng flash floods sa iba pang liblib na lugar, o ang mga batang kailangan ng kalinga. Sa patung-patong na hamon na hinakaharap ng ating mga kababayan, umabot na nga po sa milyun-milyon ang mga pamilyang kinakailangan ninyong pakainin, gamutin, at arugain.

Ibayong kapasidad para magmalasakit ang hinihingi sa inyong mga kawani ng DSWD. Hindi lahat ng tao, kayang gawin ang ginagawa ninyo. Kapag panahon ng kalamidad, marami sa inyo ang ni hindi makaupo dahil sa mga kailangang gawin. Pati ho ang ating butihing kalihim, kung minsan nagme-meeting po kami nakapikit na siya.  Pero tumatango naman at sumasagot naman sa tamang oras. Minsan lang ho nagpa-pause ako at hinihintay ko lang hong dumilat naman po. Kahit ilang segundo lang ng delay sa relief goods at gamot, alam ninyong hindi ninyo mapapatawad ang sarili dahil madaming nagugutom, nauuhaw, nagkakasakit, natatakot, o nalulungkot. Bukod dito, alam ko na habang nagpapatulo kayo ng pawis, luha, at minsan dugo para makatulong sa nangangailangan, may ilan tayong kababayan—at talagang mangilan-ngilan lang naman—na kung magsalita ay akala mo wala na tayong kayang gawing tama. Nabalitaan ko nga na noong relief operations para sa bagyong Yolanda, marami sa inyo ang tumatangging umidlip man lang sandali dahil natatakot na makunan ng larawan at masabihang hindi ginagawa ang trabaho.

Naalala ko tuloy ang nangyari kay Secretary Petilla, na katuwang rin natin sa paglilingkod sa mamamayang Pilipino. Noong tinantiya ng Department of Energy kung gaano katagal maibabalik ang kuryente sa 320 na mga lugar na tinamaan ng bagyong Yolanda, ang kanila pong kalkulasyon anim na buwan para maibalik ang kuryente. Pero pinangako niya na bago mag-Pasko, napailawan na lahat nang ito. Nag-Pasko nga po, o ‘yung bisperas ng Pasko, at may at may ilaw na sa 317 na bayan. Ibig sabihin po kulang ng tatlo. ‘Yong tatlo naihabol nang 14 na oras lang ang delay. Sa kabila nito, meron pang nagsasabing dapat siyang mag-resign. Six months naging 40 days and 14 hours. At sobrang pagkakamali raw po ‘yung plus 14.

Matuwid at marangal na tao si Secretary Petilla kaya nagpasya siyang isumite ang kanyang resignation. Ang sagot ko sa kanya, kalokohan naman yata ‘yan. Maraming makikinabang sa nagawa niya at mababalewala ang kanyang husay kung magbibitiw siya. Kumbaga sa paaralan, lampas 99 percent na po ang nagawa niya, at sabi po ng mga kritiko niya, bagsak siya. Siguro ho kung itong mga kritikong to ang nagpapatakbo ng isang paaralan swerte na silang tumakbo ng isang taon dahil walang pumapasa sa kanilang paaralan. Dahil, di ho ba, noong nag-aaral tayo—‘yung 91 ang tanda ko A. ‘Yong 99-point-ganyan–e di siyempre A rin, wala naman pong A+. ‘Pag A na grado mo, bagsak ka. Wala sigurong karapatang magturo iyang mga iyan.

Hindi naman po kalabisang sabihin na kung minsan, kulang sa konsuwelo ang trabaho ninyo, sana ho kung minsan lang.  Madalas, mas marami ang batikos kaysa pasasalamat, mas mahaba ang listahan ng reklamo kaysa papuri. Sa kabila nito, natutuwa ako, nabibilib ako, na wala akong nababalitaang isa man sa inyo na nagwagayway ng puting bandila para sabihing sumusuko na kami.  Wala po akong narinig na nagsasabing, “Mr. President, hindi ko na kaya, aalis na po ako.” At hindi po ibig sabihin niyan puwede itong araw na ito.  Marami kayong hinarap na trahedya at pasakit pero nananatili kayong tagapagsulong ng pagbangon ng mga kapwa ninyo Pilipino. Dahil diyan, personal kong pinasasalamatan ngayon ang bawat isa sa inyo sa tapang at dedikasyong ipinakita ninyo habang ginagampanan ang inyong tungkulin. Talaga naman po, sa ngalan ng sambayanan, maraming, maraming salamat po sa inyong lahat.

Hayaan ninyong espesyal kong banggitin sina G. Danny Franco Bitara at Bb. Noemi Mongaya, na nalagay sa bingit ng kamatayan habang isinasabuhay ang misyon at layunin ng Department of Social Welfare and Development. Kayo ang ehemplo ng mga tunay na tagapaglingkod ng mamamayang Pilipino. Mamaya rin po, kapag pinarangalan na ang iba pang pinakamahuhusay na tagapaglingkod ng DSWD, ganito po ang pakiusap ko: palakpakan natin sila nang malakas. Iparamdam natin sa kanila ang pagpapahalaga at paghangang nararapat sa kanila.

Mayroon nga po akong naisip habang pinagmuni-munihan ko ang pangalan ng inyong ahensiya. Department of Social Welfare AND Development, may diin po sa “and.” Hindi lang pangangalaga sa kapakanan o welfare ng mamamayan ang mandato ng ahensiyang ito. Mayroon ding pagbabago, mayroon ding pag-unlad. Development. Kaya mayroon ding pag-asa.

Sa tulong ninyo at ng mga programa ng DSWD, naisasakatuparan natin ang mandatong ibinigay ng taumbayan. Halos apat na milyong kabahayan na ang nabigyan ng pagkakataon para sa mas magandang bukas sa ilalim ng Pantawid Pamilya, na pinalawak ang sakop nitong 2013 para mas marami pa ang matulungan. 334,158 na kabahayan naman ang naging bahagi ng Sustainable Livelihood Program. Sustainable: ibig pong sabihin, pangmatagalan, hindi lang pang-photo-op. Para sa mga senior citizen, 1.53 bilyong pesos ang naipagkaloob na pensyon sa mga lolo at lolang matagal nang nalugmok sa laylayan ng lipunan. 2.85 bilyon naman ang nagugol na para sa Supplemental Feeding Program ng 1.45 milyon na kabataan. Sa iba’t ibang kategorya ng Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan – Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of Social Services o KALAHI-CIDSS—sana ho mas maiksi lang ‘yong pangalan pero ganoon kahaba naman ang benpisyo–nasa 3,541 kabuuang bilang ng proyekto na ang nabigyan ng ayuda. Tinatayang 841,000 po ang kabahayang makikinabang o makikingabang dito. Ang maganda, iyong mga komunidad mismo ang pumili ng proyektong pagkakalooban ng pondo; bahagi sila ng pagpapasya, kaya alam rin nating bahagi sila ng pangangalaga at pagsigurong magtatagumpay ang bawat proyekto.

Sana po huwag kayong magsawa na makipagtulungan sa akin upang maibalik ang pagtitiwalang ipinagkaloob ng mamamayang Pilipino. Sa husay ng trabaho ninyo dito, nararamdaman kong magiging mas malawak, mas mabilis, mas pangmatagalan pa ang magagawa nating pagkalinga at pagpapaunlad sa kalagayan ng ating mga kababayan—ang ating mga boss—kahit na gaano pa ito kahirap. Sa huli, ang isang tao o institusyon ay hindi tinitingnan sa bilang ng taon na itinagal niya sa mundo, kundi sa kung gaano karami ang kanyang natulungan; sa kung gaano karami ang nabago niyang buhay; sa kung gaano kalalim ang naging positibong ambag niya sa lipunan; at sa kung gaano karami ang nabigyan niya ng pag-asa. Inaanyayahan ko kayong lahat dito sa DSWD, tara, ipagpatuloy natin ang pagbibigay ng lahat ng ating makakaya. Malayo na ang ating narating, at alam kong sa patuloy ninyong pakikiambag, lalo pang malayo ang ating mararating.

Maraming salamat po. Maligayang anibersaryo po sa inyong lahat.

Posted in NewsComments Off

Over 15,000 ‘Yolanda’ survivors avail of DSWD’s cash-for-work

Cash-for-Work beneficiaries at work.

Cash-for-Work beneficiaries at work.

Some  15,188 survivors of Typhoon Yolanda from Eastern Visayas benefited from the Cash-for-Work (CFW) Program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) that started on November 24 and is still on-going.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said, “The CFW program is part of our early recovery efforts to introduce normalcy to affected families in the region.”

She added that more than the relief distribution, those who are able are being engaged in the important work of rebuilding the area.

Prior to the CFW, DSWD initially implemented Food-for-Work (FFW)  from November 10 – 23 where beneficiaries were given food packs in exchange of helping in repacking and distributing relief goods.

Under the CFW, the beneficiaries are given work according to their capacity such as loading and unloading of relief goods, repacking of goods, food preparation, cleaning of debris, coastal clean-up, canal dredging, and communal gardening, among others.

Other ‘Yolanda’ victims assisted in the inventory of damaged properties.

Qualified beneficiaries are those 18 years old and above, able and willing to be assigned where they will be needed the most.  Areas of assignment are in the different relief and rehabilitation hubs of the Department in Tacloban City, Isabel, Ormoc City, Catbalogan and Guiuan, as well as at community projects in Basey in Western Samar and Burauen in Leyte.

Each worker is paid daily an average of P260 for eight hours of work.

To date, DSWD has released P22,055,766 for the implementation of the program.

CFW of other groups

Sec. Soliman also cited other organizations implementing CFW programs  to affected families in the region.

Among these are the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), whose CFW Program targets to cover around 200,000 beneficiaries and the Tzu Chi Foundation, which gave P500 to each of its CFW beneficiaries.  ###

Posted in FeaturedComments Off

Page 66 of 139« First...102030...6465666768...8090100...Last »
Summary of Foreign and Local Donations
As of October 30, 2014 (8:00am)

P98,504,441.87 - Local Donations

USD23,784,101.78 - Foreign Donations


e-AICS Logo

Hunger Project

The Story of Juan

DSWD GAD










Donate Online

Transparency Seal

Citizen's Charter

The Story of Juan

Pantawid Pamilya Impact Evaluation 2012 Data


Archives


Hit Counter provided by Los Angeles SEO
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