DSWD continues relief work even during the holidays

Sec. Soliman briefs representatives of international humanitarian organizations on the on-going relief work in Tacloban City.

Secretary Soliman briefs representatives of international humanitarian organizations on the on-going relief work in Tacloban City.

Tacloban City, Leyte – To ensure that relief distribution will continue in areas affected by Typhoon Yolanda, there will be no holiday break for some Field Offices and personnel of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).

“Our staff will be on rotational duty so that relief distribution will not be interrupted,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

Likewise, to hasten the relief operations, DSWD has recently opened two relief hubs in Isabel, Leyte and Catbalogan, Samar for storage and repacking of relief commodities.

To date, DSWD is now on its 10th round of relief distribution in the 60 municipalities and three cities in Eastern Visayas.

As of December 16, a total of 3,321,351 rice and food packs, 494,213 liters of water, 109,601 pieces of canned goods, and 244,444 pieces of high energy biscuits have already been distributed to the 273,782 displaced families in the region.

Non-food items such as tents, hygiene kits, blankets, mosquito nets, mats,  towels, cooking pots, water containers, slippers, and plastic cups, among others were also given out.

Meanwhile, Sec. Soliman briefed international humanitarian organizations about the ongoing relief operations in the region during a site visit last week.

International development partners present were Swiss Ambassador Ivo Sieber, Canadian Ambassador Neil Reeder, Australian Agency for International Development Counsellor Robyn Hill, United Kingdom Embassy Deputy Head of Mission Trevor Lewis, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Philippines Deputy Head Markus Werne, and Spanish Agency for International Development Corporation Coordinator Vicente Zaragosa.#

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DSWD accepts P6.5M donation of PAGCOR

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman accepts the P6,561,600.00 check donation from Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) Chief Executive Officer Cristino Naguiat for Typhoon Yolanda victims in Eastern Visayas.

Witnessing today’s turn-over at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City are (from left) DSWD Disaster Risk Reduction and Response Operations Officer-in-Charge Felix Armenia, PAGCOR Human Resource and Development Officer-in-Charge Myrna Reyes, and PAGCOR Corporate Communications Assistant Vice-President Maricar Bautista.

PAGCOR said the donation was allocated for the agency’s Christmas celebration but the employees opted not to celebrate, instead, they chose to give the money to the Department for the benefit of the typhoon victims. ###

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DSWD accepts P6.5M donation of PAGCOR

pagcorDepartment of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman accepts the P6,561,600.00 check donation from Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) Chief Executive Officer Cristino Naguiat for Typhoon Yolanda victims in Eastern Visayas.

Witnessing today’s turn-over at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City are (from left) DSWD Disaster Risk Reduction and Response Operations Officer-in-Charge Felix Armenia, PAGCOR Human Resource and Development Officer-in-Charge Myrna Reyes, and PAGCOR Corporate Communications Assistant Vice-President Maricar Bautista.

PAGCOR said the donation was allocated for the agency’s Christmas celebration but the employees opted not to celebrate, instead, they chose to give the money to the Department for the benefit of the typhoon victims. ###

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Rebuilding homes, rebuilding lives

Guiuan, Eastern Samar – A day after Typhoon Yolanda hit this town, couple Teresita and Gabino Bitwaran knew that they have to start from scratch again.

The home they both worked hard for to build had been destroyed in just a flick of a finger.

Teresita, 63, a retired teacher, still gets emotional upon reminiscing how their once secure house in Brgy. Alingarog was torn down by strong winds.

Gabino, on the other hand, cannot hide his frustration. However, as the head of the family, he has to lead his family in moving forward.

New roof

Gabino’s first step was to  rebuild their home.

With some of their savings, he prioritized to buy eight galvanized iron sheets to secure their bedroom.

For the other parts, Gabino used the old sheets that are still in good condition and the tarpaulins given to them as part of the relief goods distributed in their barangay.

Despite the couple’s eagerness to rebuild their home, they do not have enough funds to buy all their needed materials.

Construction materials from DSWD, DOE

To help homeless families like the Bitwarans, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are distributing galvanized iron (GI) sheets which they can use to repair their houses.

Initial recipients are those from this town and Tanauan, Leyte. They were identified through an assessment conducted by the DSWD.

To date, some 2,154 GI sheets have been distributed to 132 households here while 9,270 pieces were given to 585 families in Tanauan.

“These materials are a great help to us,” the Bitwaran couple expressed after receiving 20 GI sheets.

The DSWD and DOE will be distributing a total of 75,000 pieces of 3×9 GI sheets to qualified households.  ###

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The irony of pain

Residents of Brgy. Malawig gather around relief goods and await their names to be called to receive a family foodpack. Relief reached the community a day after the typhoon

Residents of Brgy. Malawig gather around relief goods and await their names to be called to receive a family foodpack. Relief reached the community a day after the typhoon.

Coron, Palawan – From afar, the island of Barangay Malawig is a picture of an apocalypse. Aboard a tiny boat, upon reaching the shore of the island, one can gain a better perspective of the kind of strength Typhoon Yolanda had.

Indescribable.

It was a moving canvass. The elements of nature took wrath to a higher degree and pounded the island to rubbles. A closer look will reveal walls and roofs of houses effortlessly peeled off, schools and stores hammered to pieces, and livelihoods mercilessly vanished to bits – an instant paralysis brought by ‘Yolanda’. At every turn, pain manifests itself on faces of people who survived destruction. Behind every fallen home are layers of stories after stories, told and retold, but the gravity of pain is unchanged.

Emma Kapian, 30, one of the residents of Barangay Malawig lost her twin. Her experience of survival can be traced in tracks of tears that languidly fall on her face upon recalling her experience.

Her story was told many times over, and the freshness of pain can break the coldest of hearts.

Embattled

It was seven in the night and storm surge swiftly seeped through the house of Emma. Her knees trembled as she hurriedly clutched her 3-day old twins on each arm to escape the rising ocean that was engulfing the island. Her husband, Senkaji, carried their eldest daughter Mary Jill, and salvaged a few household items and ran.

Ang lakas ng hangin, at talagang hindi pa namin naranasan ‘yung ganun kalakas na hangin, pero sabi ko, kahit hinang-hina na ako, kailangan talaga naming manakbo pataas ng bundok kasi mabilis ang pagtaas ng tubig at malakas ang alon (The wind was strong, something we had never experienced before, but I had to collect all energy I had left for we have to climb up the hill as quickly as we can to beat the rising water),” recalled Emma.

With what was left of her energy, she, along with her husband and Mary Jill, climbed up a hill adjacent to their house.

Masakit po ‘yung mga bato sa paa kapag nayayapakan, pero akyat pa rin po kami (The rocks we’re stepping on were rough and painful to our feet but we kept moving anyway),” she explained.

The winds and churning waves were smashing their bodies to the hill, but the Kapians steadily climbed barefoot until they found a safe spot.

Nu’ng naramdaman na naming medyo mataas na kami e huminto na kami (As soon as we felt that we’ve reached higher grounds, we settled),” relayed Senkaji.

High above ground, the Kapians watched Yolanda whip their house and the waves ruthlessly dragged their neighbours’ boats to the ocean.

“Para kaming nanunuod lang na sirain [ang] mga bahay namin, pero wala kaming magawa. Mahirap pang kalaban ‘yung hangin (It was like we were just watching our house get destroyed, but we cannot do anything. The winds were just strong),” said Emma.

The Agony of Emma

The strong wind stretches Emma’s energy to drain, but she had mustered a power to wrap her twins in blanket and attempted to keep them from getting soaked in heavy rain. She held her twins dearly, and prayed that they pass through the storm unharmed.

Eventually, the wind subsided.

As ocean water levelled to the ground, the magnitude of destruction showed its face. It was a crashing image of a pitiless devastation.

The whole of Malawig cried in mourning of lost houses, livelihoods and a community in general. It was as if someone had lifted the whole barangay to dizzying heights and dropped it at staggering speed and left whatever is erected to falter.

Emma was astonished. In her hands were hard, cold bodies of her twins. Their lips turned purple. She shook both babies and pressed her ear to their chests. Their heart had stopped beating. They were dead.

“Para akong dinagukan ng malakas sa likod, hindi po ako nakaiyak kaagad  (It felt like a strike in the back, and I can’t even cry),” said Emma in a trembling voice.

She looked to Senkaji and Mary Jill, and broke down.

“Tinignan ko ulit, baka buhay pa, pero matigas na sila pareho talaga, wala ng iyak (I took a second look at them to check if they are breathing, but both bodies were hard and cold, and I they are not crying anymore),” she said crying.

As Emma looked down, she saw the enormity of damage caused to their barangay. Her emotions were torn, and her heart cried for the loss of her home, her livelihood and her children.

Senkaji tightly embraced Mary Jill and Emma, as he himself shed tears.

“Okay lang sana kung bahay lang at ‘yung bangka ang nasira e, pero ang pinakamasakit, nawala pa ‘yung kambal namin (I could have easily accepted the loss of our house and boat, but the most painful to accept was the loss of my twin),” said Senkaji, whose boat for fishing was destroyed as well.

“Ngayon po, kabuhayan namin wala na din, aasa na rin muna sa relief (Now our livelihood has vanished too [so] we will try to survive throught the relief goods [given to us]),”  Senkaji added.

They used to earn a maximum of P25,000 a month from fishing, and have now been left without an option for income.

Undreamt of

In the aftermath of the storm, help and support flooded barangay Malawig.

DSWD-Field Office IV-B attended to the needs of typhoon-devastated barangays and delivered relief to its residents.

There were 160 houses in the area and all of which were damaged if not swept away completely.

Today, rehabilitation, debriefing of victims and rebuilding of houses are ongoing.

Various organizations have converged to hasten the restoration of damaged houses and provide support to residents who have lost their livelihoods.

The International Labor Organization (IOM) had made their full assessment of Malawig and will implement an income-generating activity as temporary livelihood for the residents.

Relief goods from DSWD, the British Navy, LGU of Coron and other non-government organizations have been distributed to all residents. All efforts that have been done by far are progressive.

“Hindi po talaga kami makapaniwala na ganito ang aabutin namin, wala pa kaming ganitong karanasan noon (We could not believe this would happen, we had never had this before),” said Emma.

Pero wala naman magagawa kundi bumangon (But we can’t do anything but rise above it),” she added, in hope of rising from the catastrophe.

The other cheek

The island-strip of Malawig is situated off the farthest end of the northern coast of Palawan. Even after Yolanda had hit the barangay, the shoreline is as majestic and breathtaking as it ever was. If you stand by the shore and look over the sea, and away from the destruction caused by Yolanda, it becomes a refreshing beauty that seemingly cleanses the pain of looking at typhoon-pounded community of Malawig.

The stark contrast is an apparent message of nature, that misery and beauty sit side by side to each other. A person can always turn around, to see vibrancy, to shake up a perspective and lead the eyes to a brighter, more pleasing blue beyond.

Emma buried her twin under their reconstructed hut. Her story will be told and retold and the gravity of pain will gradually subside in time. Her eyes may have cried tons of tears, but her spirit is indestructible.

“Babangon ulit, baka may planong iba ang Diyos sa amin  (We will rise from this, maybe God has a different plan for us), “ she said, while forcing a faint smile.

The most honest of emotions is pain. It easily manifests itself on the face of a human being. It tells a story – of heartbreak, losing a loved one, a home and a life you once knew. Pain lingers and clings to the heart until the agony settles and fades into memory. The mightiest of strength, however, is drawn from the greatest pains ever inflicted. No matter the kind of catastrophe ever ruin a person’s life, hope, and will to survive can endure supreme emotional pain.

Emma had lost her twin, but her transcendent optimism fuses peace to her mourning soul.#

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The irony of pain

Residents of Brgy. Malawig gather around relief goods and await their names to be called to receive a family foodpack. Relief reached the community a day after the typhoon

Residents of Brgy. Malawig gather around relief goods and await their names to be called to receive a family foodpack. Relief reached the community a day after the typhoon.

Coron, Palawan – From afar, the island of Barangay Malawig is a picture of an apocalypse. Aboard a tiny boat, upon reaching the shore of the island, one can gain a better perspective of the kind of strength Typhoon Yolanda had.

Indescribable

It was a moving canvass. The elements of nature took wrath to a higher degree and pounded the island to rubbles. A closer look will reveal walls and roofs of houses effortlessly peeled off, schools and stores hammered to pieces, and livelihoods mercilessly vanished to bits – an instant paralysis brought by ‘Yolanda’. At every turn, pain manifests itself on faces of people who survived destruction. Behind every fallen home are layers of stories after stories, told and retold, but the gravity of pain is unchanged.

Emma Kapian, 30, one of the residents of Barangay Malawig lost her twin. Her experience of survival can be traced in tracks of tears that languidly fall on her face upon recalling her experience.

Her story was told many times over, and the freshness of pain can break the coldest of hearts.

Embattled

It was seven in the night and storm surge swiftly seeped through the house of Emma. Her knees trembled as she hurriedly clutched her 3-day old twins on each arm to escape the rising ocean that was engulfing the island. Her husband, Senkaji, carried their eldest daughter Mary Jill, and salvaged a few household items and ran.

Ang lakas ng hangin, at talagang hindi pa namin naranasan ‘yung ganun kalakas na hangin, pero sabi ko, kahit hinang-hina na ako, kailangan talaga naming manakbo pataas ng bundok kasi mabilis ang pagtaas ng tubig at malakas ang alon (The wind was strong, something we had never experienced before, but I had to collect all energy I had left for we have to climb up the hill as quickly as we can to beat the rising water),” recalled Emma.

With what was left of her energy, she, along with her husband and Mary Jill, climbed up a hill adjacent to their house.

Masakit po ‘yung mga bato sa paa kapag nayayapakan, pero akyat pa rin po kami (The rocks we’re stepping on were rough and painful to our feet but we kept moving anyway),” she explained.

The winds and churning waves were smashing their bodies to the hill, but the Kapians steadily climbed barefoot until they found a safe spot.

Nu’ng naramdaman na naming medyo mataas na kami e huminto na kami (As soon as we felt that we’ve reached higher grounds, we settled),” relayed Senkaji.

High above ground, the Kapians watched Yolanda whip their house and the waves ruthlessly dragged their neighbours’ boats to the ocean.

“Para kaming nanunuod lang na sirain [ang] mga bahay namin, pero wala kaming magawa. Mahirap pang kalaban ‘yung hangin (It was like we were just watching our house get destroyed, but we cannot do anything. The winds were just strong),” said Emma.

The Agony of Emma

The strong wind stretches Emma’s energy to drain, but she had mustered a power to wrap her twins in blanket and attempted to keep them from getting soaked in heavy rain. She held her twins dearly, and prayed that they pass through the storm unharmed.

Eventually, the wind subsided.

As ocean water levelled to the ground, the magnitude of destruction showed its face. It was a crashing image of a pitiless devastation.

The whole of Malawig cried in mourning of lost houses, livelihoods and a community in general. It was as if someone had lifted the whole barangay to dizzying heights and dropped it at staggering speed and left whatever is erected to falter.

Emma was astonished. In her hands were hard, cold bodies of her twins. Their lips turned purple. She shook both babies and pressed her ear to their chests. Their heart had stopped beating. They were dead.

“Para akong dinagukan ng malakas sa likod, hindi po ako nakaiyak kaagad  (It felt like a strike in the back, and I can’t even cry),” said Emma in a trembling voice.

She looked to Senkaji and Mary Jill, and broke down.

“Tinignan ko ulit, baka buhay pa, pero matigas na sila pareho talaga, wala ng iyak (I took a second look at them to check if they are breathing, but both bodies were hard and cold, and I they are not crying anymore),” she said crying.

As Emma looked down, she saw the enormity of damage caused to their barangay. Her emotions were torn, and her heart cried for the loss of her home, her livelihood and her children.

Senkaji tightly embraced Mary Jill and Emma, as he himself shed tears.

“Okay lang sana kung bahay lang at ‘yung bangka ang nasira e, pero ang pinakamasakit, nawala pa ‘yung kambal namin (I could have easily accepted the loss of our house and boat, but the most painful to accept was the loss of my twin),” said Senkaji, whose boat for fishing was destroyed as well.

“Ngayon po, kabuhayan namin wala na din, aasa na rin muna sa relief (Now our livelihood has vanished too [so] we will try to survive throught the relief goods [given to us]),”  Senkaji added.

They used to earn a maximum of P25,000 a month from fishing, and have now been left without an option for income.

Undreamt of

In the aftermath of the storm, help and support flooded barangay Malawig.

DSWD-Field Office IV-B attended to the needs of typhoon-devastated barangays and delivered relief to its residents.

There were 160 houses in the area and all of which were damaged if not swept away completely.

Today, rehabilitation, debriefing of victims and rebuilding of houses are ongoing.

Various organizations have converged to hasten the restoration of damaged houses and provide support to residents who have lost their livelihoods.

The International Labor Organization (IOM) had made their full assessment of Malawig and will implement an income-generating activity as temporary livelihood for the residents.

Relief goods from DSWD, the British Navy, LGU of Coron and other non-government organizations have been distributed to all residents. All efforts that have been done by far are progressive.

“Hindi po talaga kami makapaniwala na ganito ang aabutin namin, wala pa kaming ganitong karanasan noon (We could not believe this would happen, we had never had this before),” said Emma.

Pero wala naman magagawa kundi bumangon (But we can’t do anything but rise above it),” she added, in hope of rising from the catastrophe.

The other cheek

The island-strip of Malawig is situated off the farthest end of the northern coast of Palawan. Even after Yolanda had hit the barangay, the shoreline is as majestic and breathtaking as it ever was. If you stand by the shore and look over the sea, and away from the destruction caused by Yolanda, it becomes a refreshing beauty that seemingly cleanses the pain of looking at typhoon-pounded community of Malawig.

The stark contrast is an apparent message of nature, that misery and beauty sit side by side to each other. A person can always turn around, to see vibrancy, to shake up a perspective and lead the eyes to a brighter, more pleasing blue beyond.

Emma buried her twin under their reconstructed hut. Her story will be told and retold and the gravity of pain will gradually subside in time. Her eyes may have cried tons of tears, but her spirit is indestructible.

“Babangon ulit, baka may planong iba ang Diyos sa amin  (We will rise from this, maybe God has a different plan for us), “ she said, while forcing a faint smile.

The most honest of emotions is pain. It easily manifests itself on the face of a human being. It tells a story – of heartbreak, losing a loved one, a home and a life you once knew. Pain lingers and clings to the heart until the agony settles and fades into memory. The mightiest of strength, however, is drawn from the greatest pains ever inflicted. No matter the kind of catastrophe ever ruin a person’s life, hope, and will to survive can endure supreme emotional pain.

Emma had lost her twin, but her transcendent optimism fuses peace to her mourning soul.# # #

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DSWD, DepED literacy project for PWDs takes off in Ilocos Region

San Fernando City, La Union – To further empower persons with disabilities (PWDs), the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) partnered with the Department of Education (DepEd) to implement a literacy project for this sector.

Dubbed “I LOVE PWDs” Project, it aims to develop desirable working knowledge, attitudes, values and skills of PWDs to help them cope with challenges in life.

“I LOVE PWDs” stands for Interactive Learning Operations Via Education for Persons With Disabilities.

Under the project, 35 teachers who have undergone special training on managing PWDs will conduct free home learning sessions to the beneficiaries.

They will use the five learning modules of DepEd’s Alternative Learning System (ALS) such as writing, communication, numeracy skills, critical thinking and problem solving, and moral recovery program.

To date, there are 50 PWD-beneficiaries of the project coming from different places in Ilocos Region.

“This project has been a big help to us. We appreciate the efforts of DSWD and DepEd for opening opportunities to improve our status in life,” a beneficiary said

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that this project will help PWDs boost their self-esteem and self-worth.

She encourages other DSWD Field Offices to adopt the program in their respective areas.

According to Dr. Edwin Ferrer, Officer-In-Charge of DepEd-ALS, the PWDs under this program have improved their self-confidence.

“They are not afraid of other people anymore. Their learning capacity is also enhanced,” Dr. Ferrer said.

For his part, DSWD-Field Office I Director Marcelo Nicomedes Castillo said that the “I Love PWDs” Project is essential in preparing the PWDs for higher learning in formal or non-formal institutions like the DSWD–Area 1 Vocational Rehabilitation Center (AVRC).

“The AVRC provides skills training to PWDs such as basic computer operation, canteen management, and massage therapy,” he explained.

For the teachers, sharing their time and knowledge is their own little way  of making a difference in the lives of  PWDs. ###

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CCT beneficiaries to be hired as tourist guides

Legazpi City, Albay – In an effort to provide sustainable source of income to beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program in the Bicol Region, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), in partnership with the Department of Tourism (DOT), will implement the “Trabahong Turismo” Program next year.

“We want the beneficiaries to become self-reliant,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

Under the program, Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries will be hired as tourist guides and tourist spot caretakers.

With Bicol region considered as one of the top tourist destinations in the country, it opens an opportunity for poor families to earn.

Among the famous tourist destinations in the region are Donsol, Sorsogon for butandingor whale shark-watching; the Mayon Volcano in Legaspi City; and, the Camarines Sur Watersports Complex (CWC) in Naga City.

DSWD, DOT and the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the implementation of the project.

DSWD-Field Office V will identify the beneficiaries of the program who will be attending DOT training courses on multi-lingual tour guiding, frontline services, river guiding, housekeeping, tourism awareness, and mountain guiding.

“We will continue to tap other partner-agencies and the private sector as well to create more livelihood opportunities for our disadvantaged people,” Sec. Soliman added. ###

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