Local chief execs pledge support for DSWD nat’l community-driven dev’t project

Mayor Javier  and  Gov. Petilla (inset) share the impact of CDD in Leyte to other local chief executives present in the launching of KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP.

Mayor Javier  and  Gov. Petilla (inset) share the impact of CDD in Leyte to other local chief executives present in the launching of KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP.

Ormoc City, Leyte – Javier Mayor Leonardo M. Javier, Jr., head of the League of Municipalities of the Philippines, and Leyte Governor Leopoldo Dominico Petilla both expressed their support for the implementation of Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services – National Community-Driven Development Program (KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP), which was recently launched by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).

Speaking as a partner of DSWD in the implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS, which KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP is the expanded version of, Mayor Javier shared how his municipality was able to benefit from the project, having implemented it since 2006.

“People truly benefit from this,” he said, describing the Kalahi-CIDSS’ process of giving citizens the opportunity to decide among themselves what sub-projects will be implemented in their respective communities to respond to their needs.

Empowering 

According to him, the biggest change that happened in Javier is that the people have now become empowered through Kalahi-CIDSS.

He said, “Naniniwala na ang mga tao sa sarili nila at sa kakayanan nila (People now believe in themselves and in their abilities).”

He described how even the attitudes of people in Javier changed when Kalahi-CIDSS entered the municipality.

Mayor Javier added, “Ang Kalahi-CIDSS ay may good values formation. Gumaganda ang kalooban ng mga tao(Kalahi-CIDSS has good values formation. It improves the people’s attitude),” citing how they are now cleaning theirbackyards as an example of how they are taking care of their homes and their communities.

Meron na silang ownership. Ayaw na nilang mapahiya (They now have ownership. They do not want to be embarrassed anymore),” he explained.

Full transparency

Mayor Javier also noted Kalahi-CIDSS’ thrust for transparency, and how this has improved the dynamics between the citizens and the local government unit (LGU).

He said, “Kapag full transparency, nagkakaroon ng tiwala ang mga tao (If there is full transparency, people develop faith in the government).”

He also mentioned how Kalahi-CIDSS has led to changes in the role of the mayors in their municipalities.

He said, “There is a shift in the role: from direct implementers to development facilitators,” describing how it is now the village folks who are taking charge in the implementation of activities for the improvement of their living conditions. This, he said, allows mayors to focus on the overall development of their municipalities.

As the LMP head, he also asked other mayors to show the same level of support to KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP.

“My request is for all the mayors to give 110% support to this program. Napakaganda kasi ng program na ito  (This is a very good program),” the mayor stated.

Mayor Javier also noted how KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP will be able to help in post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation following Typhoon Yolanda.

He said, “I am very confident in the ability of the program to help people in building back after ‘Yolanda’.”

“My wish is to implement the program in all municipalities in this country. We will adhere to our desire of reaching inclusive growth.”

Prov’l support

For his part, Governor Petilla, described how the program has helped the province and how it will be able to continue to support it following ‘Yolanda’.

He said, “Kalahi-CIDSS helps bridge the gap of poverty. Malaking bagay ito sa amin sa Leyte, lalo na at malaki angtama ng ‘Yolanda’ sa amin (This will be a big help for us in Leyte, especially because we were heavily affected by ‘Yolanda’).”

He added, “We will show full support for this. The province will always be ready as a partner.”

The governor emphasized the importance of sustaining the changes brought about by Kalahi-CIDSS, saying that these have to be strengthened and sustained to produce long-term impact.

Expansion

Kalahi-CIDSS was piloted by the national government in 2002 and launched in 2003 to alleviate poverty in poor rural communities using the community-driven development (CDD) approach. It has now been expanded to a national scale and renamed KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP.

CDD focuses on empowering and building up the capacities of citizens and local government units so they will be able to lift their own communities out of poverty, giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions on locally identified options for development and manage resources to implement sub-projects that address the needs they have identified.

Designed to respond to the needs of the communities affected by ‘Yolanda’, 554 of KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP’s 847 target municipalities were hit by the typhoon last November 2013.

Aside from empowering communities, KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP also seeks to capacitate local government units and instills good governance by promoting the principles of participation, transparency, and accountability among local government officials.

KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP works in close partnership with LGUs at the provincial, municipal, and barangay levels to ensure that the needs of the communities are responded to, while ensuring that its implementation is in line with the local development plans.

It will be implemented from 2014 to 2019. ###

 

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DSWD supports legislation to regulate public solicitation

To protect the public from unscrupulous solicitations, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) supports the immediate enactment into law of House Bill No. 4650 which seeks to regulate the conduct of fund-raising and soliciting for any charitable activities.

Earlier this month, the Committee on Social Services of the House of Representatives has recommended for approval House Bill No. 4650 or the Public Solicitation Act, which aims to enhance mechanisms in conducting public solicitations, increase the share of proceeds allocated for intended programs and projects, as well as protect its beneficiaries from exploitation, and impose higher penalties for those who would violate the law.

House Bill No. 4650 was sponsored by Representatives Arturo Robes, Giorgidi Aggabao, and Josephine Ramirez-Sato.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman explained that the measure is relevant because it would also enable the government to effectively and efficiently monitor the use of funds generated from such activities.

Coverage, exemptions

The bill covers national government agencies (NGAs), government owned and controlled corporations (GOCCs), local government units (LGUs), non-government organizations (NGOs), including faith-based People’s Organizations and Civil Society Organizations, state colleges and universities.

It also covers chapters and affiliates of similar international organizations operating in the Philippines, which are partly or fully financed by funds solicited from or contributed by the public or private sectors.

Meanwhile, organizations and agencies created by law that specifically confer authority on these organizations and agencies to solicit or conduct fund campaign for charitable or public welfare purpose are exempted from application of a solicitation permit.

Likewise, caroling during festivals or celebrations as a form of solicitation and solicitation for the construction of a church, mosque or any structure of worship shall not be required a solicitation permit.

Prohibited acts

DSWD urges the public to be wary of unscrupulous solicitors.

“We need to be aware of the validity of various solicitations and fund-raising activities that we are called upon to support,” Sec. Soliman stressed.

These prohibited acts include soliciting without a valid permit from DSWD, the Provincial Social Welfare Development Office (PSWDO) or the City/Municipal Social Welfare Development Office (P/C/MSWDO); soliciting beyond the allowed area of coverage or violating the mode of solicitation as indicated in the approved solicitation permit; use of expired, falsified or tampered solicitation permit; and, use of the solicited funds other than the intended purpose.

Furthermore, using beneficiaries as part of the strategy or mechanism in conducting the solicitation activity; use of solicitation paraphernalia which portray a dehumanizing picture, information or situation of the intended beneficiaries; and, lottery and other games of chance where the source of prizes shall be taken from the proceeds of the solicitation activity are prohibited.

Penalties

When enacted into law, those found to violate this shall be punished with imprisonment of not less than one year but not more than three years or a fine of not less than P100,000 but not more than P500,000 or both, at the discretion of the court.

For the first offense, the solicitation permit of the individual, organization or agency shall be revoked and no permit shall be issued to them for a period of two years from the date of violation.

For the second offense, the individual, organization or agency shall be permanently banned from conducting solicitation activities. ###

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DSWD livelihood project benefits 60,000 poor families from ARMM

Reducing poverty in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) is on top of the Aquino administration’s road map for countryside development. With this, the national government infused funds for its comprehensive development to be undertaken by different government agencies.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), one of the implementing agencies, received P1.6 billion to intensify the implementation of its existing socio-economic development projects in the region.

The provision of sustainable livelihood to poor families is one of the programs that DSWD focuses on.

Livelihood assistance

Zenaida Singh Guiamalon, 44,  a resident of Barangay Datu, Saudi Ampatuan of Maguindanao province had always dreamt of putting up a wallet-making business to help her family and to put her skill to good use.

Today, with the help of the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP),  Zenaida is a budding entrepreneur producing at least 1,000 wallets a month.

SLP is a community-based capacity building program that seeks to improve the socio-economic status of program beneficiaries.  It employs a Community-Driven Enterprise Development (CDED) which equips beneficiaries to actively contribute to production and labor markets by making use of available resources.

The program has two tracks from which beneficiaries have the option to choose from after undergoing capacity building activities – the Micro-Enterprise Development Track and the Employment Facilitation Track.

Under the Micro-Enterprise Development Track, program participants may avail of seed capital assistance from DSWD, while Employment Facilitation Track facilitates access to employment opportunities based on their qualifications.

Zenaida availed of the Micro-Enterprise Development Track.

“Dati, isa lang akong maybahay at kuntentong i-budget ang sweldo ng aking asawa. Ang hirap kasi [na] ang dami naming gastusin lalo pa at sampu ang aming mga anak (Before, I was a plain  housewife, with only my husband’s income to budget.  It was very difficult because we had a lot of expenses, especially with 10 children),” Zenaida said.

She also shared that she already had two sewing machines prior to the assistance she received from SLP, but they were not able to start a business for lack of enough capital.  Thus, Zenaida and her husband were overjoyed when they qualified for the livelihood program.

SLP gave Zenaida the needed capital assistance amounting to P10,000 and the opportunity to become contributors in the development of ARMM.

Aside from the capital component, SLP provided Zenaida with capacity building activities to ensure that she is equipped in managing a business.

Her products are now recognized within her community and in neighboring markets, giving her an average profit from P15,000 to P 20,000 per month, which more than providing for her family’s needs.

Asked why she focused on wallet-making for her business, Zenaida said,“Naniniwala ako na ang wallet ay bahagi na nang buhay na bawat isa. Dagdag pa rito, ang kliyente ng wallet ay mula bata hanggang sa matanda  babae man o lalaki (I believe that a wallet is almost part of everybody’s daily life.  Also, wallet-making is a lucrative business as our patrons range from children to adults, male and female alike), “ Zenaida explained.

Zenaida and her husband run the business with the help of their two sons.  They are now marketing their products in nearby municipalities like Esperanza and Isulan in Sultan Kudarat and in Parang and Datu Odin Sinsuat in Maguindanao.

She added that her family is very thankful for the great opportunity given to them and for believing that they, too, are capable of helping them achieve better lives.

Microenterprise model

As proven by the Guiamalon Family, the microenterprise component of the SLP is effective in achieving peace and development in ARMM.

SLP particularly wants to engage women in the productive endeavor and involve the entire community in starting small businesses that have the potential to flourish.

Presently,  SLP is being implemented in  Basilan, Maguindanao, Lanao Sur A & B, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi.

Through SLP, DSWD hopes to change the lives of 62,335 families with a total budget of P623.35 million. ###

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DSWD gets Australian grant for early childhood care and dev’t projects

Alangalang, Leyte –Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) Deputy Secretary Ewen McDonald  will lead the project launch of the Australian grant for the construction of early childhood and development centers, to be implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) through the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services-National Community-Driven Development Program (KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP), tomorrow in this town.

The grant, worth AU$12 million, will be used for the construction of approximately 468 classrooms and day care centers in communities where KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP will be implemented.

These communities have been identified to have significant gaps in education.

Part of the criteria for funding is that the communities should have the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, another poverty alleviation program of the DSWD that provides conditional cash transfers to qualified families so they can support the health and education of the children.

The project, which will run from 2014 to 2016, is also part of the national government’s post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation following Typhoon Yolanda.

Approximately 117 of its target 468 classrooms and day care centers will be constructed in ‘Yolanda’-affected areas.

“This project shows the continuing strong partnership between us and the Australian government to respond to our country’s continuing problems with poverty and lack of education. Through these school buildings and day care centers, we are not only helping provide for the supply side requirement of Pantawid Pamilya, we are also taking steps to ensure that these children, particularly those who have been affected by ‘Yolanda’, will have a fighting chance for a better future,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

Previous partnership

Prior to the provision of the said grant, the DFAT has already extended a US$10 million grant in 2012 to KALAHI-CIDSS for the construction of school buildings and day care centers in 200 municipalities.

Originally meant to cover the construction of 515 of said structures, KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP was able to implement 626, or 122% of its target, through savings, generated partly because of the community-driven development (CDD) strategy of the program, in which residents themselves work together to implement their identified sub-project.

The day care centers and school buildings benefited some 102,213 households, with 15,584 students able to study in the said educational facilities.

KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP

KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP is the expanded version of the Kalahi-CIDSS, piloted by the national government in 2002 and launched in 2003 to alleviate poverty in poor rural communities using the CDD approach.

CDD focuses on empowering and building up the capacities of citizens and local government units so they will be able to lift their own communities out of poverty, giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions on locally identified options for development and manage resources to implement sub-projects that address the needs they have identified.

Designed to respond to the needs of the communities affected by ‘Yolanda’, 554 of its 847 target municipalities were hit by the typhoon last November 2013.

KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP will be implemented from 2014 to 2019. ###

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DSWD, JICA team up to intensify disaster preparedness in PH

In an effort to prepare the country to meet the effects of climate change, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (NDRRMC) through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD),  Office of Civil Defense, and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) came up with the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Capacity Enhancement Project (DRRM-CEP).

One of the concrete outputs of the cooperation is the formulation of the National Disaster Response Plan (NDRP) which tackles issues on the need for timely, effective, and coordinated response to disasters or calamities in all levels of government.

The DRRM-CEP, backed up by the national disaster response plan, will be used during the onslaught of tropical cyclones and monsoon rains.

DSWD Undersecretary Parisya Hashim-Taradji received the DRRM-CEP Plan from JICA Project Formulation Advisor Hayato Nakamura during the Department’s flag raising ceremony yesterday at DSWD Central Office, Batasan Hills, Quezon City .

The DRMM-CEP, whose drafting began in March 2012, is intended to assist DSWD in formulating its own disaster response plan, policies, protocols on humanitarian response, including the training of stakeholders.

Usec. Taradji conveyed her gratitude to JICA for their continuous  support and contribution especially during times of disaster.

“The bond between DSWD and JICA is getting stronger as years pass. We value your commitment and support in the risk management programs by sharing our learnings,” Usec. Taradji stated.

For more than 40 years, JICA has been sending funds and experts to assist the country’s risk reduction and management.

“As a long-time partner of DSWD, we are very glad to share this DRMM-CEP PLAN. We expect that this comprehensive plan will serve as DSWD’s guide in all phases of the disaster management process,” said Nakamura.

Nakamura also stressed that controlling natural hazards is virtually impossible but enhancing response capacity is the most effective way to manage and reduce disaster risks.

The turnover ceremony ushers in the observance of the National Disaster Consciousness Month this July, with the theme,“Kahandaan at Kaligtasan ng Pamayanan Pundasyon ng Kaunlaran.”  

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DSWD, JICA team up to intensify disaster preparedness in PH

DSWD Usec. Taradji (second from right) receives the DRRM-CEP from JICA Project Formulation Advisor Hayato Nakamura (second from left). Witnessing the turn over are DSWD Assistant Secretary Vilma Cabrera and JICA Expert OCD Takaaki Kusakabe.

DSWD Usec. Taradji (second from right) receives the DRRM-CEP from JICA Project Formulation Advisor Hayato Nakamura (second from left). Witnessing the turn over are DSWD Assistant Secretary Vilma Cabrera and JICA Expert OCD Takaaki Kusakabe.

In an effort to prepare the country to meet the effects of climate change, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (NDRRMC) through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD),  Office of Civil Defense, and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) came up with the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Capacity Enhancement Project (DRRM-CEP).

One of the concrete outputs of the cooperation is the formulation of the National Disaster Response Plan (NDRP) which tackles issues on the need for timely, effective, and coordinated response to disasters or calamities in all levels of government.

The DRRM-CEP, backed up by the national disaster response plan, will be used during the onslaught of tropical cyclones and monsoon rains.

DSWD Undersecretary Parisya Hashim-Taradji received the DRRM-CEP Plan from JICA Project Formulation Advisor Hayato Nakamura during the Department’s flag raising ceremony yesterday at DSWD Central Office, Batasan Hills, Quezon City .

The DRMM-CEP, whose drafting began in March 2012, is intended to assist DSWD in formulating its own disaster response plan, policies, protocols on humanitarian response, including the training of stakeholders.

Usec. Taradji conveyed her gratitude to JICA for their continuous  support and contribution especially during times of disaster.

“The bond between DSWD and JICA is getting stronger as years pass. We value your commitment and support in the risk management programs by sharing our learnings,” Usec. Taradji stated.

For more than 40 years, JICA has been sending funds and experts to assist the country’s risk reduction and management.

“As a long-time partner of DSWD, we are very glad to share this DRMM-CEP PLAN. We expect that this comprehensive plan will serve as DSWD’s guide in all phases of the disaster management process,” said Nakamura.

Nakamura also stressed that controlling natural hazards is virtually impossible but enhancing response capacity is the most effective way to manage and reduce disaster risks.

The turnover ceremony ushers in the observance of the National Disaster Consciousness Month this July, with the theme,“Kahandaan at Kaligtasan ng Pamayanan Pundasyon ng Kaunlaran.”  

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DSWD engages ‘Yolanda’ survivors to rehabilitate mangroves in E. Visayas

Tacloban City, Leyte –  The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) through its Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) launched early this month the Cash-for-Assets Rebuilding “Mangroves and Beach Forest” Project that would provide employment to beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program at the same time rehabilitate the mangroves in identified areas in Eastern Visayas.

Some 280 Pantawid Pamilya cash grantees who are also Typhoon Yolanda survivors living along seawalls and coastal areas in this city initially participated in the project. They completed the rehabilitation of  60 hectares of mangrove plantation in the city.

Each beneficiary received P260 per day for a maximum of 15 days.

SLP Director Georgina Ann Hernandez said that the project is part of DSWD’s rehabilitation measures for ‘Yolanda’-hit areas.

“It is both protecting the environment and providing livelihood,” Dir. Hernandez said.

She emphasized that it is important to rebuild livelihood assets such as mangroves which will pave the way for the provision  of a more sustainable livelihood for the beneficiaries such as cultivating fish, crabs, and shrimps that thrive in mangroves.

The Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation gave boots, t-shirts, and hats  for the beneficiaries while the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)  demonstrated the techniques of rehabilitating the mangroves.  The local government unit provided the propagules.

The DSWD has allotted P3 million for the rehabilitation  of mangroves in the city,  Guiuan and Hernani in Eastern Samar,  Carigara in Leyte, Basey in Samar, and  Lapinig and Palapag in Northern Samar.  ###

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DSWD engages ‘Yolanda’ survivors to rehabilitate mangroves in E. Visayas

Pantawid Pamilya parent-leader, Victoria Macariola (extreme right), receives her t-shirt, boots, gloves and other gears to be used in the cleaning up of mangroves from Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation consultant, Christine Reyes (2nd from right).   Others in photo are Dir. Georgina Ann Hernandez (in red vest), DSWD-Field Office VIII Regional Project Development Officer, Hermanito Mangalao (in blue), and Eugene Gonzales (in green) of the Ausaid.

Pantawid Pamilya parent-leader, Victoria Macariola (extreme right), receives her t-shirt, boots, gloves and other gears to be used in the cleaning up of mangroves from Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation consultant, Christine Reyes (2nd from right).
Others in photo are Dir. Georgina Ann Hernandez (in red vest), DSWD-Field Office VIII Regional Project Development Officer, Hermanito Mangalao (in blue), and Eugene Gonzales (in green) of the Ausaid.

Tacloban City, Leyte –  The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) through its Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) launched early this month the Cash-for-Assets Rebuilding “Mangroves and Beach Forest” Project that would provide employment to beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program at the same time rehabilitate the mangroves in identified areas in Eastern Visayas.

Some 280 Pantawid Pamilya cash grantees who are also Typhoon Yolanda survivors living along seawalls and coastal areas in this city initially participated in the project. They completed the rehabilitation of  60 hectares of mangrove plantation in the city.

Each beneficiary received P260 per day for a maximum of 15 days.

SLP Director Georgina Ann Hernandez said that the project is part of DSWD’s rehabilitation measures for ‘Yolanda’-hit areas.

“It is both protecting the environment and providing livelihood,” Dir. Hernandez said.

She emphasized that it is important to rebuild livelihood assets such as mangroves which will pave the way for the provision  of a more sustainable livelihood for the beneficiaries such as cultivating fish, crabs, and shrimps that thrive in mangroves.

The Philippine Disaster Recovery Foundation gave boots, t-shirts, and hats  for the beneficiaries while the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)  demonstrated the techniques of rehabilitating the mangroves.  The local government unit provided the propagules.

The DSWD has allotted P3 million for the rehabilitation  of mangroves in the city,  Guiuan and Hernani in Eastern Samar,  Carigara in Leyte, Basey in Samar, and  Lapinig and Palapag in Northern Samar.  ###

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Pantawid Pamilya Impact Evaluation 2012 Data

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