DSWD assures faster relief ops

Sec. Dinky Soliman in Ormoc City w/ Mayor Codilla, Sec. Roxas & Sec. Gazmin

Sec. Dinky Soliman in Ormoc City w/ Mayor Codilla, Sec. Roxas & Sec. Gazmin

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that relief operations for victims of Typhoon Yolanda is moving at a faster pace with roads and thoroughfares already open and passable.

Secretary Soliman flew to Ormoc City today from Tacloban City to lead in relief distribution.

The Secretary said that aside from distribution in the areas, they will also do food drops in the Eastern and Western coasts.

Relief distribution

To facilitate orderly distribution of relief goods, DSWD has set up repacking and storage hubs for relief items in Tacloban, Guiuan and Ormoc.

As of November 12, some 60,607 food packs have been delivered of which 16,344 went to Guiuan hub for victims from Eastern Samar while 44,263 were for the hub in Tacloban

Likewise, DSWD will start delivering today the 40,000  metric tons of High Energy Biscuits from World Food Programme.

Two water filtration plants are operational with a capacity of 6,000 liters per hour.

So far, about 15,000 gallon or 60,000 liters have been processed and already distributed by eight tanks of the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP).

Around 35,505 water bottles of 500 ml each, 35,210 one-liter bottles, and 168 of 5-gallon containers were also distributed in Tacloban City.

Repacking of 45,000 sacks of rice donated by the World Food Programme is ongoing at the warehouse of the National Food Authority (NFA).  These will be distributed to families in Tacloban and Guiuan.

The target for the Tacloban hub is to repack 15,000-20,000 family food packs per day with the help of some 120 volunteers. The volunteers will be given food-for-work comprising three kilograms of rice per four hours of work.

Arriving goods

Around 5,000 tents from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) is also expected to be arriving today.

About 100 tons of relief goods will also be shipped by three C130 of Taiwan Airforce.

A Philam Life truck loaded with 100 sacks of food packs is also on its way to the city.

Seven Philpost trucks carrying 488 sacks or 4,880 food packs are on their way to Basey, Samar.

Some 1,400 food packs are also loaded to MV Kapitan Felix Oca for delivery to Tacloban.

The United State of America has committed to lend four C130 flights and choppers for transportation of goods from Manila to Tacloban and Ormoc.

An initial 800 sacks of relief are already positioned to be to be flown by the US C130.

Other repacking centers

DSWD staff from other Field Offices are in Tacloban to assist in repacking of relief and in disaster operations.

DSWD staff from other Field Offices are in Tacloban to assist in repacking of relief and in disaster operations.

Repacking of relief goods continues at the DSWD-National Resource Operations Center (NROC) in Pasay City as well as in DSWD Field Offices in Cebu, Legazpi City and Butuan City. Ateneo de Manila University has also opened its compound for repacking.

These repacking centers, along with those additional centers being arranged to be established in the upcoming days, target to produce 146,000 packs.

Volunteers may call these offices for shifting schedule.

Filling the gap 

Secretary Soliman who initially stayed in Tacloban for four days was an eyewitness to the devastation and chaos in the city.

“Most of the employees from the local government units have not reported back to work because they are still looking for their loved ones or they are still in shock,” Secretary Soliman said.

“We had to fill in the gap first because the first responders were also victims. Local officials also suffered the same fate,” she added.

Coping mechanism

“The looting,” she feels, “is a form of coping.”

“I think the people got shocked and are angry with the situation so they took out their anger and frustration on negative behavior,” the Secretary continued.

“Everyone is a victim so patience is stretched and I have to be aware of the words I use and facial expression because it can be very sensitive,” she said.

Going on

One her way to Ormoc, the Secretary had time to reflect.

She shares, “Thoughts are running through my mind – What is the outside world saying? Are they criticizing again our effort?”

But despite the “chaotic situation” and “almost anarchy” in the area, she remains hopeful upon “seeing the beautiful mountains and silver river ways dotted by clusters of nipa hut unaffected by Yolanda’s fury.”

“It is not easy and it can be disheartening but the FILO Team – (DILG) Secretary Mar (Roxas), (DND) Secretary Voltaire (Gazmin) and me – support each other. FILO is ‘first-in, last-out.’”# # #

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DSWD assures faster relief ops

Sec. Dinky Soliman in Ormoc City w/ Mayor Codilla, Sec. Roxas & Sec. Gazmin

Sec. Dinky Soliman in Ormoc City w/ Mayor Codilla, Sec. Roxas & Sec. Gazmin

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that relief operations for victims of Typhoon Yolanda is moving at a faster pace with roads and thoroughfares already open and passable.

Secretary Soliman flew to Ormoc City today from Tacloban City to lead in relief distribution.

The Secretary said that aside from distribution in the areas, they will also do food drops in the Eastern and Western coasts.

Relief distribution

To facilitate orderly distribution of relief goods, DSWD has set up repacking and storage hubs for relief items in Tacloban, Guiuan and Ormoc.

As of November 12, some 60,607 food packs have been delivered of which 16,344 went to Guiuan hub for victims from Eastern Samar while 44,263 were for the hub in Tacloban.

Likewise, DSWD will start delivering today the 40,000  metric tons of High Energy Biscuits from World Food Programme

Two water filtration plants are operational with a capacity of 6,000 liters per hour.

So far, about 15,000 gallon or 60,000 liters have been processed and already distributed by eight tanks of the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP).

Around 35,505 water bottles of 500 ml each, 35,210 one-liter bottles, and 168 of 5-gallon containers were also distributed in Tacloban City.

Repacking of 45,000 sacks of rice donated by the World Food Programme is ongoing at the warehouse of the National Food Authority (NFA).  These will be distributed to families in Tacloban and Guiuan.

The target for the Tacloban hub is to repack 15,000-20,000 family food packs per day with the help of some 120 volunteers. The volunteers will be given food-for-work comprising three kilograms of rice per four hours of work.

Arriving goods

Around 5,000 tents from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) are  also expected to be arriving today.

About 100 tons of relief goods will also be shipped by three C130 of Taiwan Airforce.

A Philam Life truck loaded with 100 sacks of food packs is also on its way to the city.

Seven Philpost trucks carrying 488 sacks or 4,880 food packs are on their way to Basey, Samar.

Some 1,400 food packs are also loaded to MV Kapitan Felix Oca for delivery to Tacloban.

The United State of America has committed to lend four C130 flights and choppers for transportation of goods from Manila to Tacloban and Ormoc.

An initial 800 sacks of relief are already positioned to be to be flown by the US C130.

Other repacking centers

DSWD staff from other Field Offices are in Tacloban to assist in repacking of relief and in disaster operations.

DSWD staff from other Field Offices are in Tacloban to assist in repacking of relief and in disaster operations.

Repacking of relief goods continues at the DSWD-National Resource Operations Center (NROC) in Pasay City as well as in DSWD Field Offices in Cebu, Legazpi City and Butuan City. Ateneo de Manila University has also opened its compound for repacking.

These repacking centers, along with those additional centers being arranged to be established in the upcoming days, target to produce 146,000 packs.

Volunteers may call these offices for shifting schedule.

Filling the gap

Secretary Soliman who initially stayed in Tacloban for four days was an eyewitness to the devastation and chaos in the city.

“Most of the employees from the local government units have not reported back to work because they are still looking for their loved ones or they are still in shock,” Secretary Soliman said.

“We had to fill in the gap first because the first responders were also victims. Local officials also suffered the same fate,” she added.

Coping mechanism

“The looting,” she feels, “is a form of coping.”

“I think the people got shocked and are angry with the situation so they took out their anger and frustration on negative behavior,” the Secretary continued.

“Everyone is a victim so patience is stretched and I have to be aware of the words I use and facial expression because it can be very sensitive,” she said.

Going on

One her way to Ormoc, the Secretary had time to reflect.

She shares, “Thoughts are running through my mind – What is the outside world saying? Are they criticizing again our effort?”

But despite the “chaotic situation” and “almost anarchy” in the area, she remains hopeful upon “seeing the beautiful mountains and silver river ways dotted by clusters of nipa hut unaffected by Yolanda’s fury.”

“It is not easy and it can be disheartening but the FILO Team – (DILG) Secretary Mar (Roxas), (DND) Secretary Voltaire (Gazmin) and me – support each other. FILO is ‘first-in, last-out.’”# # #

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Statement of President Aquino on typhoon Yolanda, November 11, 2013

Last Friday, Typhoon Yolanda ravaged a large part of the Visayas region. It was one of the strongest typhoons in this country’s history, if not the world’s. We thank the experts from PAGASA, the Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Phivolcs, and DOST, who gathered together and gave us the right, detailed, information, which allowed our countrymen to prepare for the coming storm. This was also the reason for the reports of low casualty counts from the other provinces that were also in the typhoon’s path, such as Oriental and Occidental Mindoro, Negros Occidental, Palawan, Aklan, and Romblon, where their local governments were able to prepare in advance.

In spite of all this, we all witnessed the vast destruction that this typhoon wrought in Leyte and Samar. It was there where Typhoon Yolanda’s storm surges were seemingly funneled to the land, and where we saw the heaviest damage; and it is there were we are focusing aid and assistance.

We are also asking for the understanding of all. As Yolanda battered the country, electricity and communications were lost in many areas. This affected not only the communications of those who want to ensure that their families are safe, but also the coordination of our relief efforts. For us to give the aid that is required, we need to know what is needed in each area; and we had difficulty obtaining this data. There were also a number of local governments that, because of the extent of the destruction, were paralyzed, because among those who fell victim to the storm were their own personnel and officials. Just think: we returned to a situation where information had to be spread through word-of-mouth—no TVs, cellphones, or internet; stores and establishments were closed; it was difficult to organize relief efforts. This was the root cause of the chaos that erupted in some areas.

This is where the national government comes in. Instead of just cooperating and adding our efforts to that of communities, the national government must lead. The DPWH cleared roads blocked by the collapse of massive trees; all reported obstructions of roads have likewise been opened. In fulfillment of the requests of local officials, we sent 800 soldiers and policemen to Tacloban to restore peace and order. We have three repacking centers producing 55,000 family food packs every day; and I have already instructed Secretary Abaya of the DOTC to take charge of efforts to deliver relief goods where they are most needed.

The delivery of food, water, and medicines to the most heavily affected areas is at the head of our priorities. We have tasked barangays to deliver and distribute these vital needs; 24,000 family food packs were already distributed in Tacloban yesterday; and these efforts are centralized in the eight largest barangays there. We already have two water purification facilities, and many more are arriving, to ensure that our countrymen have safe drinking water. We are fixing the mechanisms to widen the scope of our government’s social housing program. And from our calamity funds, contingency funds, and savings, we have 18.7 billion pesos that can be used to rehabilitate areas that were devastated by this typhoon.

Aid is also arriving from other countries; 22 countries have pledged their assistance, including Indonesia, America, England, Japan, Singapore, New Zealand, and Hungary. The private sector is also finding different ways to help our countrymen recover, such as restoring telecommunications and the supply of oil to affected areas.

At the same time, we are declaring a State of National Calamity to accelerate the efforts of government to save, to render aid, and to rehabilitate the provinces that were ravaged by Yolanda. This is important so that we can ensure control over the prices of the basic commodities and services that our countrymen will need—to avoid overpricing and hoarding of vital products. We have also approved an additional 1.1 billion pesos for the Quick Response Fund of the DSWD and the DPWH, so that they can more quickly provide the necessary support for the recovery of our countrymen who were the victims of this typhoon.

Although we recorded a low casualty count in many of the provinces through which Yolanda passed, in the areas that were seemingly swallowed up by storm surges, it cannot be denied that we witnessed massive destruction and loss of life. Like you, I also want to know what we can do to prevent similar situations in these areas in the future.

In the coming days, be assured: help will reach you faster and faster. My appeal to you all is: remaining calm, praying, cooperating with, and assisting one another are the things that will help us to rise from this calamity.

Thank you.

Statement of His Excellency Benigno S. Aquino III
President of the Philippines On typhoon Yolanda

Reprinted from http://www.gov.ph/

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2.1 million families affected by ‘Yolanda’ — DSWD

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) reported that as of 12 noon, the number of families affected by ‘Yolanda’ has reached the two million mark  composed of 9.53 million persons as local government units (LGUs) from Regions IV-A and B, V, VI, VII, VIII, X, and CARAGA continue to assess the extent of the disaster.

Some 96,039 displaced families with 449,416 persons are staying in 1,790 evacuation centers, while 36,627 other families with 182,379 persons temporarily sought shelter in their friends and relatives’ houses.

DSWD has initially extended P10.6 million worth of relief assistance to Bicol region, Western Visayas, Central Visayas, Northern Mindanao, and CARAGA.

In Tacloban City, DSWD, in coordination with the local government,  set up a satellite internet service at the city hall to enable the public to communicate with their relatives.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman personally led the distribution of relief packs in the city yesterday.

“The relief operations are hampered by lack of communication and inaccessibility of the worst-hit towns, cities and barangays, but we from DSWD and other government agencies are doing our best to reach the affected population,” Secretary Soliman emphasized.

Meanwhile, the Secretary thanked the 1,906 volunteers from all walks of life who trooped to the DSWD-National Resource Operations Center (NROC) to assist in the repacking of relief goods since November 7.

“We are expecting more volunteers during the weekend when there is no work or school. Some are regular volunteers who have been helping out at NROC every time there is a disaster,” the Secretary stated.

Repacking of relief goods at NROC is on 24-hour shifting schedule. Individuals and groups who are interested to volunteer can call telephone numbers 851-2681 and 511-1259 for shifting schedule.

Likewise, volunteers in the Visayas can go to the DSWD Field Offices in Iloilo and Cebu preferably during daytime.#

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DSWD speeds up relief distribution

Staff of DSWD Field Office VII repack relief goods for distribution to victims of 'Yolanda."

Staff of DSWD Field Office VII repack relief goods for distribution to victims of ‘Yolanda.”

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman instructed all DSWD Field Offices in regions affected by Typhoon Yolanda to ensure speedy distribution of family food packs to the victims.

“We have to move fast considering the extent of the devastation. People in the worst-hit areas need food, water and medicines,” she said.

The Secretary flew this morning to Tacloban City to assess the situation of the evacuees and lead in the distribution of relief packs.

As of 12 noon, a total of 944,586 families with 4.28 million persons from Regions IV-A and B, V, VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, and CARAGA have been affected.

Of the number, 71,623 families or 330,914 persons are staying in 1,223 evacuation centers in the affected areas.

DSWD has initially provided P6.4 million worth of relief assistance to the affected families in Bicol region, Western Visayas and Central Visayas.

Some 25,000 food packs and 4,310 bottled water are scheduled to be airlifted.

A total of 42,550 family food packs are prepositioned in the affected provinces ready for distribution.

Repacking of family food packs continues at the DSWD-National Resource Operations Center (NROC) along Chapel Road in Pasay City and at the  DSWD regional offices.

Individuals and groups who are interested to volunteer can call NROC at telephone numbers 851-2681 and 511-1259  for shifting schedule.

Secretary Soliman thanked the 161 volunteers who went to NROC on November 7 and 8 to help in the repacking of family food packs.   ###

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DSWD speeds up relief distribution

Staff of DSWD Field Office VII repack relief goods for distribution to victims of 'Yolanda'.

Staff of DSWD Field Office VII repack relief goods for distribution to victims of ‘Yolanda’.

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman instructed all DSWD Field Offices in regions affected by Typhoon Yolanda to ensure speedy distribution of family food packs to the victims.

“We have to move fast considering the extent of the devastation. People in the worst-hit areas need food, water and medicines,” she said.

The Secretary flew this morning to Tacloban City to assess the situation of the evacuees and lead in the distribution of relief packs.

As of 12 noon, a total of 944,586 families with 4.28 million persons from Regions IV-A and B, V, VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, and CARAGA have been affected.

Of the number, 71,623 families or 330,914 persons are staying in 1,223 evacuation centers in the affected areas.

DSWD has initially provided P6.4 million worth of relief assistance to the affected families in Bicol region, Western Visayas and Central Visayas.

Some 25,000 food packs and 4,310 bottled water are scheduled to be airlifted.

A total of 42,550 family food packs are prepositioned in the affected provinces ready for distribution.

Repacking of family food packs continues at the DSWD-National Resource Operations Center (NROC) along Chapel Road in Pasay City and at the  DSWD regional offices.

Individuals and groups who are interested to volunteer can call NROC at telephone numbers 851-2681 and 511-1259  for shifting schedule.

Secretary Soliman thanked the 161 volunteers who went to NROC on November 7 and 8 to help in the repacking of family food packs.   ###

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DSWD asks village heads to identify shelter beneficiaries

Zamboanga City — With the ten bunkhouses at the Joaquin F. Enriquez (JFE) Sports Complex about to be completed, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) met with officials of Barangays Rio Hondo, Mariki, Sta. Barbara, Sta. Catalina and Kasanyangan to seek their assistance in identifying priority family-beneficiaries.

DSWD Region IX Assistant Regional Director Riduan Hadjimuddin explained that barangay officials are the best persons to determine the families who need the temporary shelters most as they know the circumstances of their constituents.

He added that priority families are those whose houses were partially or totally damaged during the armed conflict, with female heads, pregnant women, lactating mothers, persons with disabilities, and sick persons.

The bunkhouses will have 12 rooms, each accommodating  10-15 persons.

During the meeting, DSWD Region IX Protection Services Chief Ma. Socorro Roxas also asked the help of the officials in maintaining security as well as hygiene and cleanliness at the grandstand.

 The officials committed to assist in identifying the beneficiaries and to help in the overall maintenance of the bunkhouses and the evacuation center. They also committed to help in the provision and distribution of family food packs to the evacuees at the grandstand.

To date, there are still 17 evacuation centers in the city providing temporary shelter to 7,243 families.  Some 4,305 families are staying at the JFE. ###

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DSWD completes distribution of bigger relief in 12 quake-hit towns in Bohol

DSWD worker unloads the two-week food pack for displaced families in Sagbayan, Bohol.

 A DSWD worker unloads the two-week food packs for displaced families in Sagbayan, Bohol.

Twelve out of the 17 worst quake-hit towns in Bohol have already received the two-week worth relief supplies from the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), World Food Programme (WFP) and Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID).

These towns are Antequerra, Balilihan, Buenavista, Carmen, Catigbian, Cortes, Corella, Danao, Inabanga, Sagbayan, San Isidro, and Sevilla.

A total of 41,186 family food packs were distributed to the affected families in these towns. The food packs contain 20 kilograms of rice, 10 cans of sardines, 10 cans of beef loaf, 10 packs of noodles, 10 packs of coffee, and 10 packs of chocolate drink.

Meanwhile, DSWD will complete the delivery of 14,156 food packs to the five remaining towns of Calape, Clarin, Loon, Maribojoc and Tubigon after Typhoon Yolanda.

“We may not be able to deliver the food packs perhaps until Saturday due to Typhoon Yolanda. But we have prepositioned regular food packs in our warehouse in Tagbilaran City and in Tubigon which can be

provided to quake and typhoon-affected families, if the need arises,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

The Secretary vowed that relief distribution will continue until such time that the affected families are ready and able to meet their own basic needs. ###

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