100 Pantawid Pamilya model kids join DSWD children’s congress

In recognition of the children’s role in development, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) is holding the 2014 National Children’s Congress (NCC) today at Sequoia Hotel, Quezon City.

The activity is in observance of the annual Children’s Month Celebration, with this year’s theme, “Bata Kasali Ka, Ikaw ay Mahalaga” which focuses on the participation of  children in nation-building.

Around 100 children from 17 regions nationwide will be attending the NCC. They are expected to identify the issues or problems that greatly affect their sector.

The children-participants will also develop a policy recommendation that will be presented to  legislators for their consideration in the formulation of laws  for children.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that the activity is timely in reiterating the message that children are the future of the nation.

She added,  “Majority of our programs are focused on promoting children’s rights and welfare. Apart from the centers and institutions that we maintain, we are the lead in the implementation of Pantawid Pamilya, the government’s flagship poverty reduction program.”

Pantawid Pamilya is a human development program of the national government that invests in the health and education of children 0-18 years old.

As of October 24, 2014, there are 10 million children-beneficiaries of the program. As beneficiaries they have better chances of  finishing high school and growing up healthy.

As part of the congress, DSWD will also award the national winner of the 2014 Pantawid Pamilya Exemplary Child.  The award is given to a child-beneficiary who showed admirable accomplishments in his or her  home, school, and community.

The national winner will be chosen from among the regional winners. ###

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Yeng Constantino and Quest – KAYA KO ANG PAGBABAGO

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THE RYZZA MAE SHOW – OCTOBER 23 2014

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Sec. Soliman talks about children’s rights, welfare in ‘The Ryzza Mae Show’

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman was the main guest today of the famous children’s program, the Ryzza Mae Show, in line with the celebration of the Children’s Month.

The Secretary gamely interacted and engaged in light banter with the child-host, Ryzza Mae, on the National Children’s Month celebration and on the different programs and services implemented by DSWD to promote children’s rights and welfare.

The appearance of Sec. Soliman in the Ryzza Mae Show aims to educate the public on the efforts being done by the government that lead to the betterment of the children.

Asked by Ryzza Mae about what the Department is doing, Sec. Soliman said, “ Ang DSWD ay naniniguro na ang mga bata ay naaalagaan, napoprotektahan, napapakain, pinag-aaral, at hindi naaabuso (DSWD makes sure that children are taken care of, protected, fed,  sent to school, and are not abused).”

Sec. Soliman also shared that DSWD is implementing the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program which provides education and health cash grants to qualified households with children 0-18 years old.

In response, Ryzza Mae reiterated the points said by Sec. Soliman and urged parents saying, “ Sa  mga magulang dapat pala talagang alagaan, pakainin,  pag-aralin at hindi maaabuso kaming mga bata (To all parents,  it is indeed your responsibility to take care of your children, send them to school,  feed them, and  ensure that  children are not abused).”

Sec. Soliman also mentioned that for the Children’s Month, DSWD will hold the 2014 National Search for Pantawid Pamilya Exemplary Child. The search aims to recognize Pantawid Pamilya children-beneficiaries who are models of excellence in both their schools and communities.

For this year, five children who are already regional winners will vie for the national title on October 25.

Sec. Soliman was impressed by the intelligence of Ryzza Mae saying that “she personifies a bright child worthy of emulation by other children.”

Sec. Soliman also taught Ryzza Mae the dance steps of DSWD’s new campaign jingle entitled “Kaya Ko Ang Pagbabago”.

The campaign brings into the fore the message that Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries have stepped up and worked hard at achieving positive changes in their lives.  ###

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Pantawid Pamilya values role of children

In the Philippines, it could be said that a typical family’s life revolves around the children. Parents work hard to provide for their children’s needs, and even single family members help out in the care of their nephews and nieces.

To further emphasize the importance of children in the family and community, October has been declared as the National Children’s Month pursuant to Presidential Proclamation 267 signed into law in 1992. The annual month-long celebration features varied activities highlighting the continuous advocacy and promoting children’s rights and welfare.

This year’s theme, “Bata Kasali Ka, Ikaw ay Mahalaga”, underscores the need for children’s active participation in issues involving their sector.

Several programs and laws were instituted to safeguard children’s rights. Among these is the creation of the Local Council for the Protection of Children (LCPC), signing of the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) Law and the implementation of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program.

Pantawid Pamilya is a human development program of the national government that invests in the health and education of children 0-18 year old. As of October 8, 2014, there are 10 million children who have better chances of growing up healthy and in school.

According to Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman, “Majority of our programs are focused on children’s rights and welfare. Apart from the centers and institutions that we maintain, we are the lead in the implementation of  Pantawid Pamilya, the government’s flagship poverty reduction program.”

“We want to make sure that in the years to come, there are millions of children who are not only healthy, but are able to finish high school. This will give them a better chance of landing gainful employment,” Sec. Soliman added.

In 2012, Pantawid Pamilya also launched the National Search for Exemplary Children that aims to recognize children beneficiaries who exemplified admirable values in their homes, schools and communities. These children served as spokespersons in their communities.

In October 2013, Shemiah Pineda of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro bested 17 Regional finalists.

In her acceptance speech, she mentioned about the importance of education and being at your best despite of the circumstance you are in.

“Sana po maging magandang ehemplo ako sa lahat ng mga batang mahihirap upang magpursige sa kanilang pag-aaral, pagbutihin ang lahat ng kanilang ginagawa at pagyamanin ang mga biyayang natatanggap dahil hindi lahat ng bata ay nabibigyan ng pagkakataon na matulungan upang makapagtapos ng pag-aaral  (I hope that I will be a good example to all poor children to pursue their studies, improve on everything that they do, and value the blessings that they received since not all children are given the opportunity to finish their studies),” she shared.

Pantawid Pamilya, in partnership with the Council for the Welfare of Children (CWC) also launched the National Children’s Congress in October 2012.

The NCC is a venue to impart to children the sense of nationalism by instilling the importance of education and health. This also serves as a venue to promote the social well-being of children-beneficiaries and encourage their involvement in public and civic affairs even at a young age.

The NCC participants are municipal, provincial and regional winners of the Search for Exemplary Children nationwide.

This year, around 100 children from 17 regions nationwide will be attending the NCC. They are expected to identify the issues or problems that greatly affect the development of children. The participants will also develop a policy recommendation that will be presented to the legislators to be included  in the formulation of laws  for children.  ###

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Pantawid Pamilya kid excels in school, wins regional search for exemplary child

“Malaki po talaga ang pagpapahalaga ko sa edukasyon. Hindi po naging hadlang ang kahirapan ng aking pamilya upang hindi ko pagbutihin ang aking pag-aaral (I really value education. My family’s poverty is never a hindrance to my desire to make good in my studies).”

This was emphasized by Angelo Urbano Caigas, 12, of Navotas City, during his testimony during the flag raising ceremony of the Department of Social Welfare and Development at the Central Office in Batasan Hills, Quezon City.

Angelo was chosen as this year’s winner of the Search for Pantawid Pamilya Exemplary Child in the National Capital Region (NCR). He will vie for the National Search on October 25.

Angelo and his 3-year-old sister became beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program in 2012.

Steadfast

Despite his youth, Angelo knows that education is the stepping stone towards fulfilling his dreams and aspirations, hence, he is steadfast in his resolve to finish his studies.

Intelligent and outspoken, Angelo is a consistent honor student at the Bangkulasi Elementary School in Navotas.

He bested other children-nominees with his excellent academic and extra-curricular achievements.

Aside from actively participating in oratorical and essay writing contests, Angelo is also the current President of the Supreme Pupil Government, commander of Batang Emergency Response Team (BERT), member of Young Journalists, and Vice-President of the Science Club.

Angelo  aspires to become a  teacher someday.

“Pangarap ko po na maging guro sa hinaharap, kasi ang paniniwala ko ay kung walang guro, ay wala rin ang lahat ng propesyon tulad ng doctor, pulis, at sundalo (I dream of becoming a teacher in the future, because I believe that if there are no teachers, there are no other professions, such as doctors, policemen, soldiers),”  Angelo firmly stated.

Investment in education

According to his mother, Marites, from among her four children, Angelo showed determination in his studies.

“Tanda ko po noong bata pa si Angelo nabanggit niya sa akin na gusto niyang umakyat ng entablado at makatanggap ng parangal at medalya (I remember when Angelo was still a small child, he used to tell me that he likes to go up the stage and accept awards and medals),” Marites stated.

She also narrated  that Pantawid Pamilya is a big help to their family.

“Naging instrumento ang Pantawid Pamilya upang makayanan naming makatawid sa araw araw, gayundin ang pagsuporta sa pag-aaral ni Angelo (Pantawid Pamilya helped us cope with our daily life, including the support for Angelo’s studies),” she explained.

“Kaya natin ang pagbabago! Ang mga taong nagnanais ng pagbabago ang siya ring dapat kumilos upang makamit ito(We can create positive change in our lives. If we want change, then we should initiate this ourselves),” Marites added.

Marites and Angelo’s testimonies  prove that Pantawid Pamilya is achieving its goal  of sending poor children to school to give them a  fighting chance of getting employed after they graduate from high school, thus, breaking the inter-generational cycle of poverty in their families.

Pantawid Pamilya provides monthly cash grants of P500 for health and P300 per child in elementary or P500 per child in high school with a maximum of three qualified children per household for their educational and nutritional needs. They have to comply to program conditions of sending their children to school, bringing them to health center for check-ups, and attending Family Development Sessions (FDS).

To date, there are 4,321,250 households enrolled in the program.  ###

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Pantawid Pamilya kid excels in school, wins regional search for exemplary child

Angelo shares that poverty is not a hindrance to success.

Angelo shares that poverty is not a hindrance to success.

“Malaki po talaga ang pagpapahalaga ko sa edukasyon. Hindi po naging hadlang ang kahirapan ng aking pamilya upang hindi ko pagbutihin ang aking pag-aaral (I really value education. My family’s poverty is never a hindrance to my desire to make good in my studies).”

This was emphasized by Angelo Urbano Caigas, 12, of Navotas City, during his testimony during the flag raising ceremony of the Department of Social Welfare and Development at the Central Office in Batasan Hills, Quezon City.

Angelo was chosen as this year’s winner of the Search for Pantawid Pamilya Exemplary Child in the National Capital Region (NCR). He will vie for the National Search on October 25.

Angelo and his 3-year-old sister became beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program in 2012.

Steadfast

Despite his youth, Angelo knows that education is the stepping stone towards fulfilling his dreams and aspirations, hence, he is steadfast in his resolve to finish his studies.

Intelligent and outspoken, Angelo is a consistent honor student at the Bangkulasi Elementary School in Navotas.

He bested other children-nominees with his excellent academic and extra-curricular achievements.

Aside from actively participating in oratorical and essay writing contests, Angelo is also the current President of the Supreme Pupil Government, commander of Batang Emergency Response Team (BERT), member of Young Journalists, and Vice-President of the Science Club.

Angelo  aspires to become a  teacher someday.

“Pangarap ko po na maging guro sa hinaharap, kasi ang paniniwala ko ay kung walang guro, ay wala rin ang lahat ng propesyon tulad ng doctor, pulis, at sundalo (I dream of becoming a teacher in the future, because I believe that if there are no teachers, there are no other professions, such as doctors, policemen, soldiers),”  Angelo firmly stated.

Investment in education

According to his mother, Marites, from among her four children, Angelo showed determination in his studies.

“Tanda ko po noong bata pa si Angelo nabanggit niya sa akin na gusto niyang umakyat ng entablado at makatanggap ng parangal at medalya (I remember when Angelo was still a small child, he used to tell me that he likes to go up the stage and accept awards and medals),” Marites stated.

She also narrated  that Pantawid Pamilya is a big help to their family.

“Naging instrumento ang Pantawid Pamilya upang makayanan naming makatawid sa araw araw, gayundin ang pagsuporta sa pag-aaral ni Angelo (Pantawid Pamilya helped us cope with our daily life, including the support for Angelo’s studies),” she explained.

“Kaya natin ang pagbabago! Ang mga taong nagnanais ng pagbabago ang siya ring dapat kumilos upang makamit ito(We can create positive change in our lives. If we want change, then we should initiate this ourselves),” Marites added.

Marites and Angelo’s testimonies  prove that Pantawid Pamilya is achieving its goal  of sending poor children to school to give them a  fighting chance of getting employed after they graduate from high school, thus, breaking the inter-generational cycle of poverty in their families.

Pantawid Pamilya provides monthly cash grants of P500 for health and P300 per child in elementary or P500 per child in high school with a maximum of three qualified children per household for their educational and nutritional needs. They have to comply to program conditions of sending their children to school, bringing them to health center for check-ups, and attending Family Development Sessions (FDS).

To date, there are 4,321,250 households enrolled in the program.  ###

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Sec. Soliman addresses participants of int’l conference on disaster response, calls on better coordination

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman speaks before the participants to the recently held Disaster Response Dialogue Global Conference with the theme "Improving trust and cooperation for more effective humanitarian responses."  In her keynote message, Secretary Soliman stressed the need to come up with an organized, strengthened, and enhanced system of collaboration between government and international partners for a more effective and comprehensive disaster response.  (Photo courtesy of Department of Foreign Affairs)

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman speaks before the participants to the recently held Disaster Response Dialogue Global Conference with the theme “Improving trust and cooperation for more effective humanitarian responses.” In her keynote message, Secretary Soliman stressed the need to come up with an organized, strengthened, and enhanced system of collaboration between government and international partners for a more effective and comprehensive disaster response.  (Photo courtesy of Department of Foreign Affairs)

“In disaster operations, trust is the foundation of an effective working relation.”

This was the thrust of the message of Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman earlier this week to the participants of the Disaster Response Government Dialogue Global Conference hosted by the Philippine Government in partnership with the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) which is chaired by Australia.

For her, in the landscape of humanitarian response, trust paves the way for cooperation needed between governments, donor institutions, and non-government organizations implementing approaches and strategies that help rebuild the lives of people affected by disasters.

“The success of any working relationship depends on the ability of different sectors to trust one another,” Sec. Soliman said

With the theme “Improving trust and cooperation for more effective humanitarian responses”, the event was participated in by representatives from international non-government organizations, donor-countries in various disaster operations worldwide, and key persons working in the department/ministry responding to disaster situations from different countries.

‘Yolanda’ experience

Sec. Soliman also shared the Department’s experience during disaster operations for survivors of Typhoon Yolanda.

She said that the magnitude of ‘Yolanda’s’ destruction was so vast that there was room for everyone to attend. This however created a logjam in attending to the needs of the survivors.

The large number of donors and new actors led to spending at least three weeks in meeting new faces, leveling off expectations, discussing working protocols and setting up procedures among other things.

“The lack of familiarity with each other made it difficult,” she said.

A lesson she shared from the disaster operations was that experiences and expertise will be most effective if practiced with proper understanding, and proper grasp of the context of the situation by those coming in to help.

“The surge of compassion and desire to help expressed by foreign agencies must be balanced with an understanding of the situation and capacities of the country they will support,” she added.

Sec. Soliman suggested that the approach of the donors/international organizations be tailor-fit to the context of the country and should encourage the use of in-country resources.

“We need support for the local agencies rather than bringing in people from foreign offices who have yet to familiarize themselves with the political and cultural climate of the country and the affected areas,” she stressed.

Sec. Soliman also took the opportunity to thank all the institutions, organizations, and countries which helped and continue to help in the relief, recovery and rebuilding of areas affected by Typhoon Yolanda.

Donation accountability issues

The Secretary also mentioned that the influx of donors at the height of the ‘Yolanda’ disaster operations posed a challenge to the country especially in ensuring that the contributions/donations are effectively utilized.

She also noted that while the financial assistance was overwhelming, a good part of the donation was given outside formal protocols and bypassed procedures and consultation with local authorities in using these to respond to the needs of survivors.

“Most funds from donor-countries in the relief phase went through United Nations agencies and international organizations, yet, the public asked government to account for it,” Sec. Soliman cited.

She said that to avoid this, all UN agencies and international organizations should coordinate officially with the government for a place within the overall coordinated disaster response.

Policy recommendations

As the core objective of the conference, the participants conducted a workshop to come up with policy recommendations for establishing and strengthening a more effective coordination between the disaster-affected country and the international humanitarian aid organizations or donor-countries.

The policy recommendations, which would be further studied, will provide a platform for a better and more effective working relationship towards the important task of rebuilding the lives of the families affected by disasters.

The dialogue was first initiated in 2011 by Switzerland through its Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), the International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA), and Office of Coordination for Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) to bring together governments and humanitarian organizations involved in international disaster response to improve trust and mutual cooperation. ###

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As of October 24, 2014 (8:10am)

P98,504,441.87 - Local Donations

USD23,784,101.78 - Foreign Donations


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