Caibaan warehouse cited by TV5, not DSWD’s – Sec. Soliman

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman reiterates that the unkempt warehouse being referred to by TV5 in its report aired on March 26 newscast and posted on its news portal is not the DSWD Relief Hub in Tacloban City.

This developed as the network issued a statement that it stands by its story on the unkempt warehouse with rotten goods and aired the same story again on April 14 over its radio station.

TV5 has said that the warehouse they have been featuring is located in Barangay Caibaan, Tacloban City.

Sec. Soliman sent a team to said area and found that there is a warehouse which is being occupied by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and World Food Program (WFP). WFP confirmed to the DSWD Field Office in the region that they are the ones maintaining the said warehouse.

Contrary to the TV5′s claim that there was a signage “Task Force Yolanda-DSWD Hub,” the team did not see one that would attribute to the DSWD warehouse.

“Attributing the Caibaan warehouse to the DSWD by showing the signage is creating a wrong public impression and misinformation,” Sec. Soliman stated.

She clarified that the DSWD warehouses are located in Barangays Apitong and Abucay in Tacloban City with the Task Force Yolanda-DSWD Hub banner prominently displayed on the façade. In the same compound in Brgy. Apitong is also the warehouse of the National Food Authority.

Misleading

Sec. Soliman said that the TV5 news report was misleading when it aired footages that showed the ‘Yolanda’ relief hub in Tacloban and segued to snapshots of scattered and unkempt relief goods including ready-to-eat food and cup noodles, without getting the explanation of the Department.

“That makes the video more misleading as the DSWD has no stockpiles of ready-to-eat food and cup noodles because these are not part of the DSWD food packs,” Sec. Soliman pointed out.

She added that DSWD has not also received any donations of such as shown in the video news clip of TV5.

In an incident report submitted to Sec. Soliman by Christian Cabrigas, caretaker of the DSWD Hub in Tacloban, he said that on March 26, a female reporter with her cameraman came to the warehouse looking for Assistant Regional Director Virginia Idano who was out to meet UN Dignitaries.

Then without informing Cabrigas, the two suddenly went inside the NFA warehouse and took a video recordings of the area.

Cabrigas further said that there were indeed piled trashes, but not a decomposing chicken as shown by the TV5 network, because the NFA warehouse personnel just started to clean the area, as they regularly do.

He also explained that the repacking of 50-kg rice sacks into 3 or 6-kg rice bags resulted in the unintentional spilling of rice grains, and at different times of the day, these rice grains are swept up and placed again in rice sacks, which are then sent to the NFA warehouse for re-milling to separate the rice grains from sand and dust particles.

DSWD has reminded the NFA to arrange the rice sacks for re-milling to avoid impression of inefficiency.

Not in disarray

Sec. Soliman said that the DSWD hub is strictly maintained as international and local donors usually visit the area anytime.

She said that media persons are welcome to see all DSWD hubs including its main warehouse, the National Resource Operations Center (NROC) in Pasay City.

Sec. Soliman even conducted her latest press conference at NROC to show that DSWD warehouses are well-maintained.

Recycled issues

Sec. Soliman also expressed disappointment over the network’s “recycling” of issues like the rotten goods being buried in Palo and distributed in Barangay Gacao, which they continue to air in their newscasts.

“We have already clarified these issues several times and for the last time let me reiterate our side,” Sec. Soliman remarked.

“Based on the certification of the Municipal Health Officer of Palo, the goods that were buried in the town only comprised of one sack of assorted biscuits, 10 cups of instant noodles, ½ sack of wet rice, and one sack of used clothing that came from ‘various agencies’ which she can no longer remember,” Sec. Soliman reiterated.

On the other hand, Sec. Soliman said the rotten goods in Brgy. Gacao were not distributed when the village chair learned that these were already spoiled. The village head reported the incident to the Municipal Social Welfare Development Office which ordered for the immediate retrieval of the goods that were donated by a private organization which directly gave these to the local government unit.

“We provided technical assistance to the local social welfare office on handling and storage of goods to avoid similar incidents,” Sec. Soliman stated.

Veracity of reports

Sec. Soliman is urging the TV network to validate the veracity of the news of their reporters.

She is demanding for a public clarification on why the reporter spinned her story to imply that the Caibaan warehouse was DSWD’s by showing a footage of the warehouse with the DSWD banner.

Sec. Soliman said that there seems to be an intention to manipulate information and video clippings. The news report and the video have provided a totally different picture of how the DSWD works.

“These are causing psychological stresses to the DSWD colleagues in Leyte and Samar who continue to provide public service despite their houses not having been fixed yet and they live in difficult situations too,” Sec. Soliman ended. ###

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Caibaan warehouse cited by TV5, not DSWD’s – Sec. Soliman

The DSWD warehouse in Brgy. Apitong.

The DSWD warehouse in Brgy. Apitong.

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman reiterates that the unkempt warehouse being referred to by TV5 in its report aired on March 26 newscast and posted on its news portal is not the DSWD Relief Hub in Tacloban City.

This developed as the network issued a statement that it stands by its story on the unkempt warehouse with rotten goods and aired the same story again on April 14 over its radio station.

TV5 has said that the warehouse they have been featuring is located in Barangay Caibaan, Tacloban City.

Sec. Soliman sent a team to said area and found that there is a warehouse which is being occupied by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and World Food Program (WFP). WFP confirmed to the DSWD Field Office in the region that they are the ones maintaining the said warehouse.

Contrary to the TV5′s claim that there was a signage “Task Force Yolanda-DSWD Hub,” the team did not see one that would attribute to the DSWD warehouse.

“Attributing the Caibaan warehouse to the DSWD by showing the signage is creating a wrong public impression and misinformation,” Sec. Soliman stated.

She clarified that the DSWD warehouses are located in Barangays Apitong and Abucay in Tacloban City with the Task Force Yolanda-DSWD Hub banner prominently displayed on the façade. In the same compound in Brgy. Apitong is also the warehouse of the National Food Authority.

Misleading

Sec. Soliman said that the TV5 news report was misleading when it aired footages that showed the ‘Yolanda’ relief hub in Tacloban and segued to snapshots of scattered and unkempt relief goods including ready-to-eat food and cup noodles, without getting the explanation of the Department.

“That makes the video more misleading as the DSWD has no stockpiles of ready-to-eat food and cup noodles because these are not part of the DSWD food packs,” Sec. Soliman pointed out.

She added that DSWD has not also received any donations of such as shown in the video news clip of TV5.

In an incident report submitted to Sec. Soliman by Christian Cabrigas, caretaker of the DSWD Hub in Tacloban, he said that on March 26, a female reporter with her cameraman came to the warehouse looking for Assistant Regional Director Virginia Idano who was out to meet UN Dignitaries.

Then without informing Cabrigas, the two suddenly went inside the NFA warehouse and took a video recordings of the area.

Cabrigas further said that there were indeed piled trashes, but not a decomposing chicken as shown by the TV5 network, because the NFA warehouse personnel just started to clean the area, as they regularly do.

He also explained that the repacking of 50-kg rice sacks into 3 or 6-kg rice bags resulted in the unintentional spilling of rice grains, and at different times of the day, these rice grains are swept up and placed again in rice sacks, which are then sent to the NFA warehouse for re-milling to separate the rice grains from sand and dust particles.

DSWD has reminded the NFA to arrange the rice sacks for re-milling to avoid impression of inefficiency.

Not in disarray

Sec. Soliman said that the DSWD hub is strictly maintained as international and local donors usually visit the area anytime.

She said that media persons are welcome to see all DSWD hubs including its main warehouse, the National Resource Operations Center (NROC) in Pasay City.

Sec. Soliman even conducted her latest press conference at NROC to show that DSWD warehouses are well-maintained.

Recycled issues

Sec. Soliman also expressed disappointment over the network’s “recycling” of issues like the rotten goods being buried in Palo and distributed in Barangay Gacao, which they continue to air in their newscasts.

“We have already clarified these issues several times and for the last time let me reiterate our side,” Sec. Soliman remarked.

“Based on the certification of the Municipal Health Officer of Palo, the goods that were buried in the town only comprised of one sack of assorted biscuits, 10 cups of instant noodles, ½ sack of wet rice, and one sack of used clothing that came from ‘various agencies’ which she can no longer remember,” Sec. Soliman reiterated.

On the other hand, Sec. Soliman said the rotten goods in Brgy. Gacao were not distributed when the village chair learned that these were already spoiled. The village head reported the incident to the Municipal Social Welfare Development Office which ordered for the immediate retrieval of the goods that were donated by a private organization which directly gave these to the local government unit.

“We provided technical assistance to the local social welfare office on handling and storage of goods to avoid similar incidents,” Sec. Soliman stated.

Veracity of reports

Sec. Soliman is urging the TV network to validate the veracity of the news of their reporters.

She is demanding for a public clarification on why the reporter spinned her story to imply that the Caibaan warehouse was DSWD’s by showing a footage of the warehouse with the DSWD banner.

Sec. Soliman said that there seems to be an intention to manipulate information and video clippings. The news report and the video have provided a totally different picture of how the DSWD works.

“These are causing psychological stresses to the DSWD colleagues in Leyte and Samar who continue to provide public service despite their houses not having been fixed yet and they live in difficult situations too,” Sec. Soliman ended. ###

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Small steps to new beginnings

Guiuan, Eastern Samar – Every helping hand is a reason big enough for 43-year-old Vilma Tacastacas to start again after her harrowing experience with Typhoon Yolanda.

Left homeless and jobless, Vilma  said there is no time for pity and dwell in the past. There is only the time to make a step forward and continue rising and recover after the storm, even one step at a time. 

 “Hindi namin akalaing maraming tulong ang darating sa amin. Noong nakita namin iyon, nagkaroon kami ng pag-asang bumangon ulit. Isa o dalawang araw pagkatapos ni ‘Yolanda,’ hindi namin alam kung makakakain kami o may mapupuntahan kami (We did not expect this much help to us. When we saw these, we already had a reason to rise. One or two days after ‘Yolanda,’ we had no idea whether we will have something to eat or a place to stay),” she shared.

Starting with a few items like coffee and candies, she started a small sari-sari store as their source of livelihood that she expanded as cash and in-kind assistance from various groups continue to pour in.

Small steps

Vilma’s family is a beneficiary of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, a project of the national government that provides conditional cash grants to qualified poor households in support for the health and educational needs of children aged from zero to 14.

As a beneficiary of the program, Vilma’s family was also a qualified recipient of an additional P1,300 cash assistance provided under the partnership of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the United Nations World Food Programme (UNWFP).

“Dahil wala naman kaming kailangang pagkagastusan dito kasi meron naman kaming bigas galing sa relief goods at may mga nagbigay ng school supplies sa mga bata, pinuhunan ko na lang ‘yung pera para mapalago itong maliit na tindahan  (Since we have rice from the relief packs and there were donors of school supplies, I used the money from UNWFP to grow this small store),”  she narrated.

The sari-sari store is a big help to the family, especially that ‘Yolanda’ had also left her husband jobless. Their small boat, which he used to earn for the family, was destroyed during the onslaught of the typhoon.

Starting with a few items, little by little, their store became bigger. Its income is enough to allow the family to buy most of their needs and even save a little.

“Hindi naman kami p’wedeng umasa na lang sa kung ano man ang tulong na darating. Dito sa aming tindahan, kahit maliit ang kita, okay na rin kaysa wala kaming ginagawa (We cannot always depend on relief. With our store, even if its income is not that big, it is better than doing nothing),” she added.

Their way out

With a smile, Vilma serves her customers all day long in the store they built using scrap wood and sheets in the tent city where they currently reside. For her, this store will also be their way out of this situation.

The tent city, set-up within the compound of Eastern Samar State University, is home to 112 families who were displaced by ‘Yolanda.’ Rebuilding their previous homes is no longer an option since their area was declared “No Dwelling Zone,” being within 40 meters from the shoreline.

Vilma admits that they have no capacity yet to build a new home, much more find a place to construct one. Hence, they have to stay here for now but not for long.

Once they have enough savings, she plans to bring their livelihood back where her husband catches fish and she selling his catch. This will give them better income and will eventually lead them to finding a safer home for their family.

Moving forward

As Vilma looks around the tent city, she sees hope. With every person who buys from her store, Vilma knows that he or she is also moving forward. With every smile she gets from children when they buy candies, she is moved and inspired to continue what she is doing.

“Kung ‘yung mga tumutulong nga sa amin umaasa na makakabangon kami, kami pa kaya ang mawalan ng pag-asa? Sila ang aming naging lakas (If those who are helping us believe that we can rise from these difficulties, then, all the more, that we should not lose our hope. They are the source of our strength),” a very optimistic Vilma shared, the tragedy of the past year already out of her mind.

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Small steps to new beginnings

Vilma tends  her sari-sari store

Vilma tends her sari-sari store

Guiuan, Eastern Samar – Every helping hand is a reason big enough for 43-year-old Vilma Tacastacas to start again after her harrowing experience with Typhoon Yolanda.

Left homeless and jobless, Vilma  said there is no time for pity and dwell in the past. There is only the time to make a step forward and continue rising and recover after the storm, even one step at a time. 

 “Hindi namin akalaing maraming tulong ang darating sa amin. Noong nakita namin iyon, nagkaroon kami ng pag-asang bumangon ulit. Isa o dalawang araw pagkatapos ni ‘Yolanda,’ hindi namin alam kung makakakain kami o may mapupuntahan kami (We did not expect this much help to us. When we saw these, we already had a reason to rise. One or two days after ‘Yolanda,’ we had no idea whether we will have something to eat or a place to stay),” she shared.

Starting with a few items like coffee and candies, she started a small sari-sari store as their source of livelihood that she expanded as cash and in-kind assistance from various groups continue to pour in. 

 Small steps

Vilma’s family is a beneficiary of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, a project of the national government that provides conditional cash grants to qualified poor households in support for the health and educational needs of children aged from zero to 14.

As a beneficiary of the program, Vilma’s family was also a qualified recipient of an additional P1,300 cash assistance provided under the partnership of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the United Nations World Food Programme (UNWFP).

“Dahil wala naman kaming kailangang pagkagastusan dito kasi meron naman kaming bigas galing sa relief goods at may mga nagbigay ng school supplies sa mga bata, pinuhunan ko na lang ‘yung pera para mapalago itong maliit na tindahan  (Since we have rice from the relief packs and there were donors of school supplies, I used the money from UNWFP to grow this small store),”  she narrated.

The sari-sari store is a big help to the family, especially that ‘Yolanda’ had also left her husband jobless. Their small boat, which he used to earn for the family, was destroyed during the onslaught of the typhoon.

Starting with a few items, little by little, their store became bigger. Its income is enough to allow the family to buy most of their needs and even save a little.

“Hindi naman kami p’wedeng umasa na lang sa kung ano man ang tulong na darating. Dito sa aming tindahan, kahit maliit ang kita, okay na rin kaysa wala kaming ginagawa (We cannot always depend on relief. With our store, even if its income is not that big, it is better than doing nothing),” she added.

 Their way out

With a smile, Vilma serves her customers all day long in the store they built using scrap wood and sheets in the tent city where they currently reside. For her, this store will also be their way out of this situation. 

The tent city, set-up within the compound of Eastern Samar State University, is home to 112 families who were displaced by ‘Yolanda.’ Rebuilding their previous homes is no longer an option since their area was declared “No Dwelling Zone,” being within 40 meters from the shoreline.

 Vilma admits that they have no capacity yet to build a new home, much more find a place to construct one. Hence, they have to stay here for now but not for long.

 Once they have enough savings, she plans to bring their livelihood back where her husband catches fish and she selling his catch. This will give them better income and will eventually lead them to finding a safer home for their family. 

 Moving forward

As Vilma looks around the tent city, she sees hope. With every person who buys from her store, Vilma knows that he or she is also moving forward. With every smile she gets from children when they buy candies, she is moved and inspired to continue what she is doing.

 “Kung ‘yung mga tumutulong nga sa amin umaasa na makakabangon kami, kami pa kaya ang mawalan ng pag-asa? Sila ang aming naging lakas (If those who are helping us believe that we can rise from these difficulties, then, all the more, that we should not lose our hope. They are the source of our strength),” a very optimistic Vilma shared, the tragedy of the past year already out of her mind.

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Crippled mom stands up stronger after ‘Yolanda’

One-legged Criselda is a picture of strength.

One-legged Criselda is a picture of strength.

Basey, Western Samar – As a ten-year old girl, Criselda Padoc survived a strong typhoon that hit this town.  A coconut tree fell on their front yard at the height of that typhoon and broke her leg. She then grew up with only one leg but remained hopeful and resilient about life.

Now 54, Criselda once again braved herself to survive during the onslaught of Typhoon Yolanda, the strongest typhoon ever recorded that devastated her town and some other eastern seaboard of Visayas.

“Bago po dumating si ‘Yolanda’ ay sigurado po ang kita namin ng asawa ko kada dalawang buwan mula sa copra(Prior to ‘Yolanda,’ my husband and I were assured of income from copra every two months),” Criselda recalled.

“Pero kinuha po ni ‘Yolanda’ ang aming kabuhayan (But ‘Yolanda’ deprived us of our livelihood),” Criselda further related.

“Dati, umaaabot ng 500 piraso ng  niyog ang aming inaani kada dalawang buwan (Before, approximately, 500 coconuts within two months were usually harvested),” she added.

Criselda’s husband, Edgardo, is a farm helper but the couple also owned some coconut trees which helped them in their livelihood.  Now, all these were torn down by ‘Yolanda.’

Thankful

She sadly narrated how ‘Yolanda’ destroyed her home with galvanized iron (GI) sheets and nipa roofings being blown away.

Deeply grateful, Criselda cited Habitat for Humanity for providing her family eight GI sheets to rebuild their house and start  anew.

Criselda added that food is also not a problem even after ‘Yolanda’ as relief goods continue to arrive in their village, Barangay Rojas, even until now.

She is thankful to DSWD and to humanitarian groups for providing these relief goods.

She even cited the recent relief distribution conducted by the Kuwait Red Crescent Society in their community.

On their own

Strong-willed Criselda, however, insists that although she is thankful for all the assistance, her family does not rely on dole-outs alone as she knows that this will end anytime.

“Isa lang nga po ang paa ko pero hindi po ako napilay ni ‘Yolanda’ (I may be one–legged but I was not crippled by ‘Yolanda’),” she said.

She added that being a member of an association of persons with disabilities (PWDs) has empowered and made her stronger.

Criselda knows the importance of standing up every time one encounters obstacles.  In fact, she is already planning on how she can help her husband earn a little  this summer.

With summer promising hot days ahead, she plans to start selling “halo-halo” again in their neighborhood just like in the previous years, giving her a daily earning of around P50 to P100 a day.

She said with resolve, “Gusto ko lang makapagtrabaho ulit para tuloy ang suporta ko sa aking anak na nag-aaral nghigh school (I just want to go back to work so I could continuously support my 15-year-old daughter who is now in high school).”

Criselda knows that typhoons will come and go, but with a strong heart and faith, she believes that no disaster can ever destroy her hope and her will to live a full life. ###

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DSWD, partners to start civil registration project for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

Palo, Leyte – Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman  enjoined  Typhoon Yolanda survivors especially those who lost vital civil documents  to avail  of the free Mobile Civil Registration Project when it starts full implementation in June.

Speaking during the project launch over the weekend in Barangay Arado in this town, Sec. Soliman underscored the importance of this endeavour which provides the opportunity to recover and reconstitute birth, death, and marriage certificates, among others, that were lost or destroyed at the height of ‘Yolanda’.

“Katulong ito sa pagbangon niyo muli  (This will help you in getting back  to normalcy),” Sec. Soliman said.  She added that civil documents are  important to  prove one’s identity.

These documents are also required in accessing basic services such as the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program and Social Pension for Indigent Senior Citizens.

The project seeks to reach out to around 100,000 residents from 18 towns and two cities of Leyte, Samar, and this province.

Those interested to avail of this project may proceed to the mobile registration tents around the three target provinces. Initial mobile tents were already set-up on April 7.

The project is funded by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and is being implemented by Initiatives for Dialogues and Empowerment through Alternative Legal Services, Inc. (IDEALS), in partnership with DSWD, Philippine Statistics Authority-National Statistics Office (PSA-NSO), local government units and their local civil registrars.

Sec. Soliman lauded the participating groups and organizations for sharing their resources to make this project possible.  ###

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DSWD, partners to start civil registration project for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

mobile registrationPalo, Leyte – Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman  enjoined  Typhoon Yolanda survivors especially those who lost vital civil documents  to avail  of the free Mobile Civil Registration Project when it starts full implementation in June.

Speaking during the project launch over the weekend in Barangay Arado in this town, Sec. Soliman underscored the importance of this endeavour which provides the opportunity to recover and reconstitute birth, death, and marriage certificates, among others, that were lost or destroyed at the height of ‘Yolanda’.

“Katulong ito sa pagbangon niyo muli  (This will help you in getting back  to normalcy),” Sec. Soliman said.  She added that civil documents are  important to  prove one’s identity.

These documents are also required in accessing basic services such as the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program and Social Pension for Indigent Senior Citizens.

The project seeks to reach out to around 100,000 residents from 18 towns and two cities of Leyte, Samar, and this province.

Those interested to avail of this project may proceed to the mobile registration tents around the three target provinces. Initial mobile tents were already set-up on April 7.

The project is funded by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and is being implemented by Initiatives for Dialogues and Empowerment through Alternative Legal Services, Inc. (IDEALS), in partnership with DSWD, Philippine Statistics Authority-National Statistics Office (PSA-NSO), local government units and their local civil registrars.

Sec. Soliman lauded the participating groups and organizations for sharing their resources to make this project possible.  ###

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Rebuilding from ground zero: DSWD provides livelihood assistance for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

Brighter days are ahead for the survivors of Typhoon Yolanda as Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman created a task force for the rebuilding of livelihood assets or  Cash for Assets.  It is led by the Department’s Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

“The Cash for Assets  is part of DSWD’s early recovery efforts to enable the families affected by disasters to return to normal life at the soonest possible time by providing them immediate cash assistance,” Sec. Soliman said.

Regional Project Management Offices of the SLP from MiMaRoPa, Western Visayas, Central Visayas, and Eastern Visayas are responsible for the implementation of the program.

DSWD field officers assigned in the affected municipalities are mobilized to undertake an assessment of beneficiaries in coordination with the local government units (LGUs) and concerned agencies to identify and implement Cash for Assets projects and activities.

Selection process

Priority beneficiaries are poor families in the DSWD’s Listahanan, a system that identifies who and where the poor are. Displaced families whose heads did not have employment prior to the occurrence of ‘Yolanda’, and families whose heads are engaged in informal labor, such as seasonal workers and street vendors among others, are also prioritized.

Participants receive the minimum wage for a period of 15 days.

The DSWD’s Disaster Risk Reduction and Response Operations Office (DRRROO) identified the hardest hit municipalities.

Rebuilding livelihood assets

To rebuild livelihood assets destroyed during the typhoon, the  Cash for Assets activities focus on  river dredging and embankment;  digging and dredging of canals and irrigation systems;  restoration of farmlands, farm-to-market roads, public markets, and school facilities;  communal farm preparation; and, clearing and cleaning of municipal roads and bridges.

In Basey, Western Samar, a total of 4,793 participants were involved in the program; while 4,500 participants were engaged in Giuian, Eastern Samar as of April 4.  Some 140,829 participants also participated in the program and received their wages through the LGUs.

In affected parts of Bohol, the program is focused on agri-infrastructure rehabilitation for communal irrigation systems.

In Palawan, high-priority areas are Coron, Busuanga, Agutaya, and Cuyo.

Engaged partners

Some of DSWD’s livelihood partners were committed to extend support. SM Foundation’s Kabalikat sa Kabuhayan provided training for farmers in Tanauan, Leyte and Guiuan, Eastern Samar.

Globe Telecom also distributed Globe mobile phones and P1,000 start-up capital for load retailing businesses for Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program partner-beneficiaries in Ormoc, Leyte.

Coming months

DSWD has maintained close coordination with public and private sector partners who may still want to provide additional aid.

In the coming months, the DSWD is expecting to scale up its livelihood rehabilitation by providing a total of P1.5 billion worth of financial capital to at least 150,000 marginalized families in ‘Yolanda’ affected  areas. ###

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As of April 15, 2014 (4:51PM)

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