DSWD program lights up Lope de Vegan spirit

After the street lights were established, reports of crimes have lessened. The brgy. council of Gen. Luna  remarked on the significant improvement on their constituent’s' sense of security.

After the street lights were established, reports of crimes have lessened. The brgy. council of Gen. Luna remarked on the significant improvement on their constituent’s’ sense of security.

The nightfall in Barangay General Luna, the farthest barangay of Lope de Vega, has been the cause of terror in almost every home in the village.

Since the place is located in the most interior part of the Northern Samar town, distance from the poblacion area made it difficult to the locals to access basic social services. In order to reach the center of Lope de Vega, one must brave a risky boat ride for a maximum of two hours and 45 minutes or endure a perilous hike in the mountains for about four hours and fifteen minutes.

Most of the families in the community earn their living by abaca fiber making (kigi), copra, and through root crops and vegetable production but the poverty incidence of 87.7 percent is still high.

With only a population of 281 individuals, composing 69 families and 56 households, Gen. Luna could be considered one of the smallest communities in the municipality, where every resident knows everyone. But being the remotest barangay of the town, Gen. Luna has become vulnerable not only to poverty but as well as to conflict.

For almost 72 years, Nanay Warlita Agte would fear her family’s safety whenever dusk would cover the skies of Gen. Luna. For the small Lope de Vegan community, the night elicits the fear of the unknown, especially when there are no lamp posts to light their streets. In Brgy. Gen. Luna, it is not the children, but the grown-ups who are most frightened whenever the sun disappears. Their fear is anchored on something more real than things that go bump in the night.

According to Brgy. Captain Liberato Victoriano, crimes occurred more often in dark street corners of Gen. Luna. There was even a recorded incident where a man was beaten by an unrecognized group in the middle of the night. There were also rampant thefts of domesticated fowls. Worst of all, there was even murder.

This was confirmed by Warlita Agte, one of the residents in the community.

“Kun gab-i, nababaraka kami, kay diri namon naiimdan an mga nagkakasulod sa barangay, labi na gud kon nakabati kami hin storya nga may ginpatay na sa sapit nga barangay”. [We get scared whenever night fell, especially when we heard rumors of murder from the next barangay]”, she said, recalling the anxiety she and her family felt when they heard the news.

The disturbing increase in crime rate prompted the residents of Gen. Luna to choose the establishment of streetlights in their community as their sub-project through the Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan (PAMANA) implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS, otherwise known as the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services, a program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) that seeks to help alleviate poverty using the community-driven development (CDD) strategy.

Kalahi-CIDSS targets the coverage of 136 municipalities in Eastern Visayas including the town of Lope de Vega.

PAMANA is the government’s framework for peace and development spearheaded by the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP). The framework follows a converged strategy of resource allocation and utilization, and aims to sustain all ongoing governance and development initiatives in communities affected by past or ongoing conflicts.

Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA works for the attainment of three major objectives: to reduce poverty, improve local governance, and empower communities by strengthening their capacities.

The installation of streetlights, which cost Php 317, 111.00, was the community’s choice to prevent and deter crime. Through the CDD approach, residents of Gen. Luna were empowered when they were given the opportunity to identify the most pressing needs in the community and come up with the solutions corresponding to the issue by choosing the type of sub-project that will answer the problem, as well as implement and maintain the said project.

Barangay Captain Victoriano reiterated that after the street lights were established, reports of crimes, such as theft and physical assault, were lessened. He remarked on the significant improvement on his constituent’s’ sense of security.

Yana mahangaturog na kami hin waray na kahadlok [Now we can sleep sound at night without fear]”, he said.

“Nagpapasalamat kami han DSWD ngan Kalahi-CIDSS ug PAMANA san paghatag sa amon sin higayon nga matagamtaman an masuna nga komunidad ngadto san mahimyang nga pamoroko. Diri la niyo ginpalaga an amon dalan, ginpalamrag gihap niyo an amon paglaum [We are very thankful to DSWD, Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA for giving us the chance to be included in the project, providing us a secured community that leads to our peaceful living. The program did not just light our streets. Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA also illuminated our hopes.]” he added.

Jenalyn Espelimbergo, a PAMANA volunteer and a mother expressed her gratitude toward the completion of the sub-project. She said she is no longer afraid to allow her daughter to visit a classmate in the next street during evening for school-related queries. “Yana diri na ako mahahadlok kun nagawas it akon mga anak kun gab-i [I no longer fear for the safety of my children whenever they go out of our house at night.]”

Aside from the restoration of peace and order in the community, Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA have also restored the power of women to participate in the community.

Today, housewives in Gen. Luna are no longer confined within their houses. Ninety percent of these women have become part of the decision-making process in the community where they are given the opportunity to speak their minds. The emergence of women’s involvement is a positive response, owing to the program’s initiative to mainstream gender equality.

The women of Gen. Luna have become enthusiastic about the expansion of Kalahi-CIDSS into a national community-driven development program, given the many opportunities they anticipate will be given to them.

“Tungod sa Kalahi-CIDSS ngan PAMANA, nagkamay-ada kami aram sa pagpadalagan san proyekto sa barangay. Masisisring namon nga bulig kami siton nga streetlight. Diri la ngay-an kami pan-balay la. Akos ngay-an namon an pagbag-o! [Through Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA, we learned how to implement projects in the barangay. We can say that we part of those streetlights. We thought we are just bound to be housewives. We can make a change!]”, Jenalyn proudly declared. #

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DSWD program lights up Lope de Vegan spirit

After the street lights were established, reports of crimes have lessened. The brgy. council of Gen. Luna  remarked on the significant improvement on their constituent’s' sense of security.

After the street lights were established, reports of crimes have lessened. The brgy. council of Gen. Luna remarked on the significant improvement on their constituent’s’ sense of security.

The nightfall in Barangay General Luna, the farthest barangay of Lope de Vega, has been the cause of terror in almost every home in the village.

Since the place is located in the most interior part of the Northern Samar town, distance from the poblacion area made it difficult to the locals to access basic social services. In order to reach the center of Lope de Vega, one must brave a risky boat ride for a maximum of two hours and 45 minutes or endure a perilous hike in the mountains for about four hours and fifteen minutes.

Most of the families in the community earn their living by abaca fiber making (kigi), copra, and through root crops and vegetable production but the poverty incidence of 87.7 percent is still high.

With only a population of 281 individuals, composing 69 families and 56 households, Gen. Luna could be considered one of the smallest communities in the municipality, where every resident knows everyone. But being the remotest barangay of the town, Gen. Luna has become vulnerable not only to poverty but as well as to conflict.

For almost 72 years, Nanay Warlita Agte would fear her family’s safety whenever dusk would cover the skies of Gen. Luna. For the small Lope de Vegan community, the night elicits the fear of the unknown, especially when there are no lamp posts to light their streets. In Brgy. Gen. Luna, it is not the children, but the grown-ups who are most frightened whenever the sun disappears. Their fear is anchored on something more real than things that go bump in the night.

According to Brgy. Captain Liberato Victoriano, crimes occurred more often in dark street corners of Gen. Luna. There was even a recorded incident where a man was beaten by an unrecognized group in the middle of the night. There were also rampant thefts of domesticated fowls. Worst of all, there was even murder.

This was confirmed by Warlita Agte, one of the residents in the community.

“Kun gab-i, nababaraka kami, kay diri namon naiimdan an mga nagkakasulod sa barangay, labi na gud kon nakabati kami hin storya nga may ginpatay na sa sapit nga barangay”. [We get scared whenever night fell, especially when we heard rumors of murder from the next barangay]”, she said, recalling the anxiety she and her family felt when they heard the news.

The disturbing increase in crime rate prompted the residents of Gen. Luna to choose the establishment of streetlights in their community as their sub-project through the Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan (PAMANA) implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS, otherwise known as the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services, a program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) that seeks to help alleviate poverty using the community-driven development (CDD) strategy.

Kalahi-CIDSS targets the coverage of 136 municipalities in Eastern Visayas including the town of Lope de Vega.

PAMANA is the government’s framework for peace and development spearheaded by the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP). The framework follows a converged strategy of resource allocation and utilization, and aims to sustain all ongoing governance and development initiatives in communities affected by past or ongoing conflicts.

Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA works for the attainment of three major objectives: to reduce poverty, improve local governance, and empower communities by strengthening their capacities.

The installation of streetlights, which cost Php 317, 111.00, was the community’s choice to prevent and deter crime. Through the CDD approach, residents of Gen. Luna were empowered when they were given the opportunity to identify the most pressing needs in the community and come up with the solutions corresponding to the issue by choosing the type of sub-project that will answer the problem, as well as implement and maintain the said project.

Barangay Captain Victoriano reiterated that after the street lights were established, reports of crimes, such as theft and physical assault, were lessened. He remarked on the significant improvement on his constituent’s’ sense of security.

Yana mahangaturog na kami hin waray na kahadlok [Now we can sleep sound at night without fear]”, he said.

“Nagpapasalamat kami han DSWD ngan Kalahi-CIDSS ug PAMANA san paghatag sa amon sin higayon nga matagamtaman an masuna nga komunidad ngadto san mahimyang nga pamoroko. Diri la niyo ginpalaga an amon dalan, ginpalamrag gihap niyo an amon paglaum [We are very thankful to DSWD, Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA for giving us the chance to be included in the project, providing us a secured community that leads to our peaceful living. The program did not just light our streets. Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA also illuminated our hopes.]” he added.

Jenalyn Espelimbergo, a PAMANA volunteer and a mother expressed her gratitude toward the completion of the sub-project. She said she is no longer afraid to allow her daughter to visit a classmate in the next street during evening for school-related queries. “Yana diri na ako mahahadlok kun nagawas it akon mga anak kun gab-i [I no longer fear for the safety of my children whenever they go out of our house at night.]”

Aside from the restoration of peace and order in the community, Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA have also restored the power of women to participate in the community.

Today, housewives in Gen. Luna are no longer confined within their houses. Ninety percent of these women have become part of the decision-making process in the community where they are given the opportunity to speak their minds. The emergence of women’s involvement is a positive response, owing to the program’s initiative to mainstream gender equality.

The women of Gen. Luna have become enthusiastic about the expansion of Kalahi-CIDSS into a national community-driven development program, given the many opportunities they anticipate will be given to them.

“Tungod sa Kalahi-CIDSS ngan PAMANA, nagkamay-ada kami aram sa pagpadalagan san proyekto sa barangay. Masisisring namon nga bulig kami siton nga streetlight. Diri la ngay-an kami pan-balay la. Akos ngay-an namon an pagbag-o! [Through Kalahi-CIDSS and PAMANA, we learned how to implement projects in the barangay. We can say that we part of those streetlights. We thought we are just bound to be housewives. We can make a change!]”, Jenalyn proudly declared. #

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DSWD provides follow-through services for street families who joined Batangas camping

DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan briefs the media on updates on the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Homeless Street Families (MCCT-HSF).Also in the panel are DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (Middle) and NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan briefs the media on updates on the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Homeless Street Families (MCCT-HSF).Also in the panel are DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (Middle) and NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

The 100 families who joined the camping activity in Nasugbu, Batangas  last month are continuously being provided with different support services to ensure that they will not return to the streets.

To date,  74 families are now living in safe houses through the provision of financial assistance and alternative family home. Their children are also enrolled under the Alternative Learning System of the Department of Education.

Likewise,  three families availed of the Balik-Probinsya program and have gone back to their home provinces;  10 families were provided with Cash-for-Work program for a period of 10 days and are now staying with their relatives;  four families who are under the regular Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program have gone back to their homes;  five families were endorsed to the National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) for further assessment; and two families are now temporarily staying at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong City for further case management.

The whereabouts of two families cannot be determined despite efforts of DSWD and the local government of Manila to locate them

DSWD, in coordination with local government units in the National Capital Region, has conducted a total of six camp-out activities from 2011 to 2015.

Activities during the camp are meant to inculcate family values, strengthen family unity, and enhance roles of parents to ensure that they can protect and take care of the well-being of their children. ###

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DSWD provides follow-through services for street families who joined Batangas camping

DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan briefs the media on updates on the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Homeless Street Families (MCCT-HSF).Also in the panel are DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (Middle) and NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan briefs the media on updates on the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Homeless Street Families (MCCT-HSF).Also in the panel are DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (Middle) and NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

The 100 families who joined the camping activity in Nasugbu, Batangas  last month are continuously being provided with different support services to ensure that they will not return to the streets.

To date,  74 families are now living in safe houses through the provision of financial assistance and alternative family home. Their children are also enrolled under the Alternative Learning System of the Department of Education.

Likewise,  three families availed of the Balik-Probinsya program and have gone back to their home provinces;  10 families were provided with Cash-for-Work program for a period of 10 days and are now staying with their relatives;  four families who are under the regular Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program have gone back to their homes;  five families were endorsed to the National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) for further assessment; and two families are now temporarily staying at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong City for further case management.

The whereabouts of two families cannot be determined despite efforts of DSWD and the local government of Manila to locate them

DSWD, in coordination with local government units in the National Capital Region, has conducted a total of six camp-out activities from 2011 to 2015.

Activities during the camp are meant to inculcate family values, strengthen family unity, and enhance roles of parents to ensure that they can protect and take care of the well-being of their children. ###

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DSWD opens SMS and voice hotlines for Listahanan

National Household Targeting Office (NHTO) Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson shows the stickers posted in houses being assessed for the second round of Listahanan to prevent double listing.

National Household Targeting Office (NHTO) Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson shows the mobile cellular phone numbers that the public can text for their complaints or inquiries on Listahanan.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has set up voice and text hotlines to respond to queries and complaints regarding the upcoming implementation of the Listahanan 2nd round of assessment.

The Listahanan is an information management system that contains a comprehensive list of families in need of social protection programs and services. It is made available to national government agencies, local government units and other social protection stakeholders.

The 2nd round of assessment, which will cover 15.3 million households nationwide, will identify poor families who will be prioritized for anti-poverty programs and services. This activity will also enable the Department to track changes and developments in the lives of poor households who were identified in the previous assessment.

Currently, the DSWD Field Offices are screening and hiring field staff who will conduct the assessment. Interested applicants may submit their application personally or via official e-mail of the nearest DSWD Regional Office or the Social Welfare and Development Team office in the province. Details of the vacancies are posted on the DSWD website.

“To ensure that the information that we will generate from this nationwide activity will be of highest integrity, we need the public to participate and provide feedback on its implementation and output,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

The public is encouraged to send complaints and queries related, but not limited to, status of application for field staff positions, misconduct of Listahanan field staff, inclusion of non-poor and exclusion of poor in the list, and families/households not assessed during the assessment, among others.

The public may reach the Listahanan through voice hotline number (02) 717-3770 local 88878 for inquiries and 88876 for grievances.

Meanwhile, others may send their concerns to text hotline numbers 0918-9122813 for Smart and Talk N’ Text subscribers and 0917-8902327 for Globe and Touch Mobile subscribers by texting Listahanan<space>name<space>location<space>grievance/inquiry. They may also reach Listahanan through its email address ask.listahanan@dswd.gov.ph or its official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/listahanan.official.

Complaints and inquiries will be received by the National Project Management Office (NPMO) and forwarded to concerned regional offices for resolution. Regional hotline focal persons can check and monitor transactions through a text hotline system accessible through the internet.

Complainants will receive notification once their message has been received. They will be given updates on the status of complaints until these are resolved. ###

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DSWD opens SMS and voice hotlines for Listahanan

National Household Targeting Office (NHTO) Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson shows the stickers posted in houses being assessed for the second round of Listahanan to prevent double listing.

National Household Targeting Office (NHTO) Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson shows the mobile cellular phone numbers that the public can text for their complaints or inquiries on Listahanan.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has set up voice and text hotlines to respond to queries and complaints regarding the upcoming implementation of the Listahanan 2nd round of assessment.

The Listahanan is an information management system that contains a comprehensive list of families in need of social protection programs and services. It is made available to national government agencies, local government units and other social protection stakeholders.

The 2nd round of assessment, which will cover 15.3 million households nationwide, will identify poor families who will be prioritized for anti-poverty programs and services. This activity will also enable the Department to track changes and developments in the lives of poor households who were identified in the previous assessment.

Currently, the DSWD Field Offices are screening and hiring field staff who will conduct the assessment. Interested applicants may submit their application personally or via official e-mail of the nearest DSWD Regional Office or the Social Welfare and Development Team office in the province. Details of the vacancies are posted on the DSWD website.

“To ensure that the information that we will generate from this nationwide activity will be of highest integrity, we need the public to participate and provide feedback on its implementation and output,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

The public is encouraged to send complaints and queries related, but not limited to, status of application for field staff positions, misconduct of Listahanan field staff, inclusion of non-poor and exclusion of poor in the list, and families/households not assessed during the assessment, among others.

The public may reach the Listahanan through voice hotline number (02) 717-3770 local 88878 for inquiries and 88876 for grievances.

Meanwhile, others may send their concerns to text hotline numbers 0918-9122813 for Smart and Talk N’ Text subscribers and 0917-8902327 for Globe and Touch Mobile subscribers by texting Listahanan<space>name<space>location<space>grievance/inquiry. They may also reach Listahanan through its email address ask.listahanan@dswd.gov.ph or its official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/listahanan.official.

Complaints and inquiries will be received by the National Project Management Office (NPMO) and forwarded to concerned regional offices for resolution. Regional hotline focal persons can check and monitor transactions through a text hotline system accessible through the internet.

Complainants will receive notification once their message has been received. They will be given updates on the status of complaints until these are resolved. ###

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DSWD continues to reach out to families of Fallen 44

DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (middle) briefs members of media on the Department's assistance to families of the slain Special Action Force (SAF) commandos during the press conference held today at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City. Also with him are (left) DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan and (right) NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (middle) briefs members of media on the Department’s assistance to families of the slain Special Action Force (SAF) commandos during the press conference held today at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City. Also with him are (left) DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan and (right) NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has reached out to all the families of the 44 Special Action Force (SAF) commandos killed during the clash with members of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighter (BIFF) in Barangay Tukanalipao, Mamasapano, Maguindanao on January 25, through counseling/stress debriefing, financial aid, and other forms of assistance.

In coordination with local government units (LGUs), the DSWD has already provided financial aid to 32 families through the Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situations (AICS) depending on the needs of the family as assessed by the social workers who interviewed the family members.

Likewise, to date, DSWD has conducted counseling/stress debriefing to 26 families including the wives, children, parents, and siblings of the slain commandos, to help them cope with their current emotional situation.

Cognizant that the families lost their breadwinners, DSWD has offered them livelihood and employment to qualified family members to sustain their source of income, as well as educational assistance for the children to continue their schooling.

The elderly parents are also assessed for inclusion in the Social Pension for indigent senior citizens.

To date, 27 families have been assessed for livelihood assistance, while nine elderly parents have been enrolled to the DSWD’s Social Pension program for Indigent Senior Citizens.

The DSWD continues to assess the needs of the families.

Meanwhile, DSWD continues to receive donations as an aid to the families of the slain PNP-SAF commandos. As of February 26, the Department has already received a total of P869,562.87.

The daily updates on donations can be accessed through dswd.gov.ph. ###

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DSWD continues to reach out to families of Fallen 44

DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (middle) briefs members of media on the Department's assistance to families of the slain Special Action Force (SAF) commandos during the press conference held today at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City. Also with him are (left) DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan and (right) NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

DSWD Assistant Secretary Javier R. Jimenez (middle) briefs members of media on the Department’s assistance to families of the slain Special Action Force (SAF) commandos during the press conference held today at the DSWD Central Office in Quezon City. Also with him are (left) DSWD-NCR Director Ma. Alicia S. Bonoan and (right) NHTO Director Vincent Andrew T. Leyson.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has reached out to all the families of the 44 Special Action Force (SAF) commandos killed during the clash with members of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighter (BIFF) in Barangay Tukanalipao, Mamasapano, Maguindanao on January 25, through counseling/stress debriefing, financial aid, and other forms of assistance.

In coordination with local government units (LGUs), the DSWD has already provided financial aid to 32 families through the Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situations (AICS) depending on the needs of the family as assessed by the social workers who interviewed the family members.

Likewise, to date, DSWD has conducted counseling/stress debriefing to 26 families including the wives, children, parents, and siblings of the slain commandos, to help them cope with their current emotional situation.

Cognizant that the families lost their breadwinners, DSWD has offered them livelihood and employment to qualified family members to sustain their source of income, as well as educational assistance for the children to continue their schooling.

The elderly parents are also assessed for inclusion in the Social Pension for indigent senior citizens.

To date, 27 families have been assessed for livelihood assistance, while nine elderly parents have been enrolled to the DSWD’s Social Pension program for Indigent Senior Citizens.

The DSWD continues to assess the needs of the families.

Meanwhile, DSWD continues to receive donations as an aid to the families of the slain PNP-SAF commandos. As of February 26, the Department has already received a total of P869,562.87.

The daily updates on donations can be accessed through dswd.gov.ph. ###

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Summary of Foreign and Local Donations
As of February 23, 2015 (5:00PM)

P98,682,166.37 Local Donations

USD23,790,534.18 - Foreign Donations


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