DSWD receives add’l donation for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman receives the P432, 679. 22 check donation of the Association of Asian Election Authorities from Commission on Elections (COMELEC) Chairman Sixto Brillantes for Typhoon Yolanda survivors.

In accepting the donation, Sec. Soliman expressed her gratitude to the donors and said that this will be used in building additional transitional units for families displaced by ‘Yolanda’.

As of July 2014, a total of 4,393 families from ‘Yolanda’-hit areas are already residing in transitional shelter units.

DSWD has already received a total of US$23,766,111. 40 and P97, 879, 377.44 local donations for ‘Yolanda‘ survivors, as of September 1.  ###

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DSWD receives add’l donation for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman receives the P432, 679. 22 check donation of the Association of Asian Election Authorities from Commission on Elections (COMELEC) Chairman Sixto Brillantes for Typhoon Yolanda survivors.

In accepting the donation, Sec. Soliman expressed her gratitude to the donors and said that this will be used in building additional transitional units for families displaced by ‘Yolanda’.

As of July 2014, a total of 4,393 families from ‘Yolanda’-hit areas are already residing in transitional shelter units.

DSWD has already received a total of US$23,766,111. 40 and P97, 879, 377.44 local donations for ‘Yolanda‘ survivors, as of September 1.  ###

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DSWD Press Statement on the Lowering of the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility in the New Penal Code of the Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council (JJWC) strongly object to the lowering of the minimum age of criminal responsibility (MACR) from 15 years old to 13 as provided in the New Criminal Code – Book I.

First, the proposed provisions in the New Criminal Code – Book I do not abide by international laws.

The Philippines is a State Party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and other international treaties promoting and protecting children’s rights.  Hence, the Philippines has obliged itself to respond to children in conflict with the law, in accordance with these treaties, to effectively serve the best interests of children and, in the short and long term, the interest of the society.

However, the proposed provisions are not consistent with the UNCRC and other treaties that call for States to develop a juvenile justice system that does not resort to judicial proceedings and to use the deprivation of liberty only as a last measure.

In lowering the MACR in Section 8 of the proposed Code, it will increase the chances of more children at a younger age to be subjected to judicial proceedings contravening the spirit and intent of the Convention.

Moreover, once a higher MACR has been established, the State must not lower it but must only progressively increase the minimum age. The proposed Section 8 provision is a set back to the Philippines efforts in advancing child rights protection.

The UNCRC Committee, in its 2009 concluding observations to the Philippine report to UNCRC compliance commended the country’s passage of the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act of 2006 (or RA 9344), which raised the MACR from 9 to 15 years old. It also expressed its concern on the initiatives to lower the MACR. It particularly urged the Philippines to ensure that the MACR is not lowered.

The proposed Section 9 provision also contravenes the international principle against discrimination when it allowed children to be tried as adults for serious crimes committed.  Children do not become adults when they commit serious crimes.  It is not the offence that determines the full maturity of children but their age, and physical and mental development. Therefore, the full protection and coverage of juvenile justice should be for all children below 18 years old

The Philippine Constitution is consistent with our international obligation and guarantees to ensure and defend the right of children from all forms of conditions prejudicial to their development.  Because of this mandate and by virtue of our international obligations, RA 9344, as amended, was enacted. The proposed provisions on children in Sections 8 and 9 of the Criminal Code are therefore not consistent with the Philippines laws.

Second, the move to criminalize younger children is anti-poor.

Prior to the enactment of RA 9344, studies found that most children involved in crimes were poor.  Most came from dysfunctioning families who lack access to basic needs, parental love and support, with very little education and were usually neglected or abused. Most committed theft and crimes against property.  Clearly, these were crimes committed for survival, safety and security.

Prior to RA 9344, the MACR was low, thus, very young children were often arrested and detained without proper procedures. It was common to find young children accused of stealing or vagrancy in overcrowded cells, mixed with adult prisoners who had been charged with rape, murder and other serious crimes.  Various reports showed how these children became subjected to bullying by guards and older prisoners and had to endure the sub-human conditions of the jail.  Since most of them came from poor families, they stayed longer in prison for lack of proper representation in the court. Most of these children became vulnerable to all kinds of abuse during arrest and detention and came out of jail worse off than before.

Juvenile delinquency has strong links to poverty and dysfunctioning families.  What these children need were help and assistance because their families cannot provide for them.  Thus RA 9344 was enacted to provide these children another chance by affording them protection, being poor and vulnerable.  The law provides protection by establishing alternative measures to make children accountable without subjecting them to adult procedures and ensuring their rehabilitation so that they become useful and productive citizens of the country.

Lastly, lowering the MACR is regressive.

Criminalizing younger children is not the answer to the root causeof juvenile delinquency. We will only fail at safeguarding their rights and preventing them from reoffending in the future.  Children commit crimes for a reason. When we do not provide them a good family and wholesome community environment to ensure they grow properly and their rights are protected then, we are the ones who are setting them to fail.  It is the consequences of our actions and decisions that will greatly influence the future of our children.

There should be a full implementation of RA 9344 as amended by RA 10630.  The law follows the principle of restorative justice and provides for a comprehensive and child-sensitive juvenile justice and welfare system.  Children are not tried as adults but are provided alternative measures for their accountability through diversion and provided with intervention for their rehabilitation and reintegration to the community. It does not only provide assistance to the child but to the family and community as well.

We emphasize the need to distinguish between making children responsible for their actions, and criminalizing them. Republic Act 9344 as amended by RA 10630 makes children responsible for the acts they have committed, without necessarily making them criminal.

We affirm with the fundamental truth that Filipino children can be rehabilitated and lead away from the life of crime. But the children cannot do it alone; the State and society can, and must, give them that choice, in order to make the change possible.  This will not only benefit our children, certainly this will benefit our nation. Thus let us join hands in assuring a good future for our children.

Lowering the MACR from 15 to 13 years old is simply not a matter of choice. ###

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Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary cites PhilHealth benefits

Oroquieta City, Misamis Occidental  – A Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program cited the benefits of being a member of the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) and urged her fellow cash grantees to also avail of the health package to help them  meet their medical needs, when needed.

Rizalyn  Real, of this city, is thankful  that her 16-year-old son, Jokring, who underwent a bone surgery in a government hospital, was able to avail of PhilHealth benefits.

“Wala po akong binayaran pagkatapos ng operasyon (I did not pay a single cent after the operation),” Rizalyn said.

Partnership

In 2012, DSWD and PhilHealth partnered to provide health care for the poor.  Some 14.7 million indigent individuals aged 21 and above identified through the DSWD’s Listahanan database of the poor are now Philhealth card holders.  Of the total, 3.9 million, Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries are enrolled under the Philhealth program, as of March 2014.

Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries are afforded with PhilHealth coverage as Sponsored Members.

Help in times of needs

She recalled that Jokring had an accident during one of his basketball games with his friends. He fractured his arm and was advised to undergo an operation to attach a steel plate on his broken bone.

Being a low-salaried utility worker, Rizalyn was reluctant to bring her son to the hospital since she knew she could not afford to pay for the hospital bill, let alone for a bone surgery operation that costs far more than what she earns.

“Pero may nakapagsabi sa akin na may PhilHealth benefits daw ang mga benepisyaryo ng Pantawid Pamilya. Dinala ko na rin siya sa ospital kaysa makita ang anak ko na hirap na hirap (But someone had informed me that Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries can avail of Philhealth benefits. I then brought him to the hospital rather than just see him in so much pain),” Rizalyn said.

She said that she only presented her son’s birth certificate and her Pantawid Pamilya identification card to the hospital’s admission office.

“Sinabi nila na gagaling daw ang aking anak (I was assured then that Jokring is going to be okay),” she added.

Rizalyn could not describe how relieved she was when the hospital staff told her that everything has been taken care of. She did not need to pay anything for her son’s operation.

“Dapat ay mga P25,000 ang aking babayaran para sa operasyon lang, pero dahil ako ay Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary, ay wala akong binayaran (I could have paid more than P25,000 for that surgery alone, but because I am a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary, I was exempted from paying),” Rizalyn said.

Today, Jokring is doing fine and is back in school.

A mother’s love and responsibility

Rizalyn’s family is a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary since 2009, receiving P800 monthly for one of her children’s education and health.

For five years, Rizalyn has been attending the Family Development Sessions (FDS) required by the program.

FDS is a regular gathering of Pantawid Pamilya parent-leaders where they discuss parent effectiveness, home and financial management, values formation, and disaster preparedness, among others.

Attendance to the FDS is one of the conditions of the program that beneficiaries should comply. The other conditions are sending children to school, and bringing them to health centers for check up.

The FDS is a unique feature of Pantawid Pamilya. Other countries implementing the program do not have this as one of their conditions.

According to her, she learned from the FDS that being a mother is more than just feeding her children, but rather being there to provide social, emotional, and spiritual support as well.

She said that the well-being of her children is paramount.

Rizalyn also shared that she is supportive of Jokring’s dream to go to college, get a good-paying job, and someday be able to buy their own house.

“Kaya nga sinisigurado ko na lagi siyang pumapasok sa paaralan. Tinuturuan ko din siya at ang kanyang mga kapatid sa kanilang mga aralin. Sa ganitong paraan, naniniwala ako na papalapit din siya sa kanyang mga pangarap (I make sure that he continuously attends his classes and help him and his siblings study their lessons. I believe that each day, his dreams get closer to becoming real),” she stated.

“Kaya ko ang pagbabago. Sa tulong ng gobyerno ay maitataguyod ko ang pag-aaral, kalusugan, at kapakanan ng aking mga anak (I can change for the better. With the help of the government, I will be able to support the education, health, and secure the future of my kids),” Rizalyn ended. ###

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Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary cites PhilHealth benefits

Rizalyn and Jokring are happy that they have risen above their health challenge...

Rizalyn and Jokring are happy that they have risen above their health challenge…

Oroquieta City, Misamis Occidental  – A Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program cited the benefits of being a member of the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) and urged her fellow cash grantees to also avail of the health package to help them  meet their medical needs, when needed.

Rizalyn  Real, of this city, is thankful  that her 16-year-old son, Jokring, who underwent a bone surgery in a government hospital, was able to avail of PhilHealth benefits.

“Wala po akong binayaran pagkatapos ng operasyon (I did not pay a single cent after the operation),” Rizalyn said.

Partnership

In 2012, DSWD and PhilHealth partnered to provide health care for the poor.  Some 14.7 million indigent individuals aged 21 and above identified through the DSWD’s Listahanan database of the poor are now Philhealth card holders.  Of the total, 3.9 million, Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries are enrolled under the Philhealth program, as of March 2014.

Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries are afforded with PhilHealth coverage as Sponsored Members.

Help in times of needs

She recalled that Jokring had an accident during one of his basketball games with his friends. He fractured his arm and was advised to undergo an operation to attach a steel plate on his broken bone.

Being a low-salaried utility worker, Rizalyn was reluctant to bring her son to the hospital since she knew she could not afford to pay for the hospital bill, let alone for a bone surgery operation that costs far more than what she earns.

“Pero may nakapagsabi sa akin na may PhilHealth benefits daw ang mga benepisyaryo ng Pantawid Pamilya. Dinala ko na rin siya sa ospital kaysa makita ang anak ko na hirap na hirap (But someone had informed me that Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries can avail of Philhealth benefits. I then brought him to the hospital rather than just see him in so much pain),” Rizalyn said.

She said that she only presented her son’s birth certificate and her Pantawid Pamilya identification card to the hospital’s admission office.

“Sinabi nila na gagaling daw ang aking anak (I was assured then that Jokring is going to be okay),” she added.

Rizalyn could not describe how relieved she was when the hospital staff told her that everything has been taken care of. She did not need to pay anything for her son’s operation.

“Dapat ay mga P25,000 ang aking babayaran para sa operasyon lang, pero dahil ako ay Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary, ay wala akong binayaran (I could have paid more than P25,000 for that surgery alone, but because I am a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary, I was exempted from paying),” Rizalyn said.

Today, Jokring is doing fine and is back in school.

A mother’s love and responsibility

Rizalyn’s family is a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary since 2009, receiving P800 monthly for one of her children’s education and health.

For five years, Rizalyn has been attending the Family Development Sessions (FDS) required by the program.

FDS is a regular gathering of Pantawid Pamilya parent-leaders where they discuss parent effectiveness, home and financial management, values formation, and disaster preparedness, among others.

Attendance to the FDS is one of the conditions of the program that beneficiaries should comply. The other conditions are sending children to school, and bringing them to health centers for check up.

The FDS is a unique feature of Pantawid Pamilya. Other countries implementing the program do not have this as one of their conditions.

According to her, she learned from the FDS that being a mother is more than just feeding her children, but rather being there to provide social, emotional, and spiritual support as well.

She said that the well-being of her children is paramount.

Rizalyn also shared that she is supportive of Jokring’s dream to go to college, get a good-paying job, and someday be able to buy their own house.

“Kaya nga sinisigurado ko na lagi siyang pumapasok sa paaralan. Tinuturuan ko din siya at ang kanyang mga kapatid sa kanilang mga aralin. Sa ganitong paraan, naniniwala ako na papalapit din siya sa kanyang mga pangarap (I make sure that he continuously attends his classes and help him and his siblings study their lessons. I believe that each day, his dreams get closer to becoming real),” she stated.

“Kaya ko ang pagbabago. Sa tulong ng gobyerno ay maitataguyod ko ang pag-aaral, kalusugan, at kapakanan ng aking mga anak (I can change for the better. With the help of the government, I will be able to support the education, health, and secure the future of my kids),” Rizalyn ended. ###

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New home brings new hope for earthquake survivors

Tubigon, Bohol - Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiary Evangeline Avilla, 43, and her family have moved into their temporary shelter in barangay Ubojan along with other 82 families whose houses were damaged when the 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck the province.

“Mas komportableng tirahan ang mga bahay na ito. Mas ligtas na kami dito kaysa doon sa mga tents (This temporary shelter is a more comfortable place to stay. We are now safer here than in the tents),” Evelyn said.

For her and for the rest of her neighbors, the temporary shelters they now occupy protect them from the scorching heat of the sun at daytime and from cold and prowling animals at nighttime.

They will stay in these transition houses while waiting for their permanent houses to be done.

The temporary shelters were constructed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in partnership with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, and the provincial and municipal governments.

To further support these families, DSWD-Field Office VII has already started the processing of livelihood assistance through its Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP). They will undergo the Community Driven Enterprise Development (CDED) training to prepare them for their livelihood projects.

The SLP’s CDED is a framework that integrates business principles and techniques necessary for the implementation of livelihood projects with community participatory processes that enable the poor from the target communities to prepare their business plans.

While CDED training is being conducted, the families continue to engage in income generating activities. Some families are market vendors, tenant farmers, and fishers, among others.

For Evelyn, she started her “street food” business using the packs of fish and squid balls given by a non-government organization.

Evelyn is hopeful that with the CDED training, she will be able to choose the right business and eventually make it succeed. ###

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New home brings new hope for earthquake survivors

Evelyn poses in her new home after the October 15 earthquake.

Evelyn poses in her new home after the October 15 earthquake.

Tubigon, Bohol - Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiary Evangeline Avilla, 43, and her family have moved into their temporary shelter in barangay Ubojan along with other 82 families whose houses were damaged when the 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck the province.

“Mas komportableng tirahan ang mga bahay na ito. Mas ligtas na kami dito kaysa doon sa mga tents (This temporary shelter is a more comfortable place to stay. We are now safer here than in the tents),” Evelyn said.

For her and for the rest of her neighbors, the temporary shelters they now occupy protect them from the scorching heat of the sun at daytime and from cold and prowling animals at nighttime.

They will stay in these transition houses while waiting for their permanent houses to be done.

The temporary shelters were constructed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in partnership with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, and the provincial and municipal governments.

To further support these families, DSWD-Field Office VII has already started the processing of livelihood assistance through its Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP). They will undergo the Community Driven Enterprise Development (CDED) training to prepare them for their livelihood projects.

The SLP’s CDED is a framework that integrates business principles and techniques necessary for the implementation of livelihood projects with community participatory processes that enable the poor from the target communities to prepare their business plans.

While CDED training is being conducted, the families continue to engage in income generating activities. Some families are market vendors, tenant farmers, and fishers, among others.

For Evelyn, she started her “street food” business using the packs of fish and squid balls given by a non-government organization.

Evelyn is hopeful that with the CDED training, she will be able to choose the right business and eventually make it succeed. ###

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Livelihood opportunity boosts a housewife’s faith in herself

Sultan Naga Dimaporo, Lanao del Norte - Having nine children, Norhaya Toma, 53, knows how difficult life could be, especially when finances are not enough to provide for the family’s basic needs.

Despite this, hope never left Norhaya who always believed that resiliency and diligence will eventually lead her to success.

Living in a small village in Barangay Piraka, Norhaya previously thought there were few opportunities to improve their way of life. She recalled that there were times when making both ends meet seemed impossible.

But like any other mother, Norhaya searched for ways to be able to bring food on their table.

Because of her resourcefulness, Norhaya was able to open her own sari-sari store, but later on also closed due to lack of capital and knowledge in managing the business.

“Ang feeling ko nasa madilim akong kuwarto. Hindi ko alam kung kailan ko makikita ang liwanag na hinahanap ko.  Nandoon na ako sa puntong tinatanong ko ang sarili ko bakit hindi ko magawang magbigay ng magandang buhay sa pamilya ko (I felt like I was in a dark room, not knowing what to do to see that light I needed. I was actually at that point of questioning myself as a person. Why can’t I provide a good life for my family?),” Norhaya sadly narrated.

She shared that her thoughts would run from negative to positive, but Norhaya held on to her faith that opportunities will come their way soon.

It helps that her family is a beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), especially in providing food and school expenses of her children.

Now, her children can go to school with food in their stomach.  Through the cash grant, Norhaya was able to buy school supplies for her children.

Pantawid Pamilya is heaven-sent for Norhaya as the program helped her provide for the growing needs of her family.  The program also boosted her hope that a better tomorrow can be achieved, and that government can help improve her family’s life.

Livelihood support

Her hope was further affirmed when she, as Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary, was given access to livelihood opportunity through DSWD’s Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

Under the convergence strategy of DSWD, the sustainability of the gains of Pantawid Pamilya is important.  Thus, the Pantawid Pamilya families are considered as among the priority beneficiaries of SLP.

SLP aims to improve the standard of living of poor households. Through the community-driven enterprise development approach, participants, like Norhaya, undergo workshops and skills training in order to determine the most suitable market-driven and resource-based livelihoods to engage in.

Norhaya felt that the long wait for that much-coveted chance is now over with her participation with the SLP. She strongly felt that SLP is one big opportunity for her to get back on her feet.

She wasted no time and eagerly participated in the capability building workshops which SLP conducted.

“Sa mga workshop ko natutunan kung paano ang tamang pag-manage sa maliit kong negosyo. Naituro sa akin ng programa kung paano makakuha ng mas maraming kostumer at paano ipagpapatuloy ang sari-sari store kahit maliit ang kapital ko (It was through the workshops where I learned the correct way of managing my small business. I learned how to get more customers, and how to sustain it even with the little capital that I have),” Norhaya said.

After undergoing the capacity building component of SLP, Norhaya opted to access the Micro-Enterprise Track of the program where participants are given capital assistance to operate a small business.

Norhaya received P10,000 capital assistance to put up her sari-sari store anew. This time, Norhaya is already knowledgeable in managing a small business.

Today, she prides herself of successfully managing her business. The store is now a source of income for her and her nine children. It has regularly brought food on their table, and has provided the basic needs of her children.

“Sa kaunting kinikita ko ay nakakabili na din ako ng kahit simpleng laruan para sa mga anak ko (With some savings, I am now able to buy even simple toys for my kids),” she happily said.

Although there were times that the business is slow, she does not mind. She is confident and hopeful that with the knowledge she gained from SLP in managing a small business, she would be able to earn more profits.

“Natutunan ko na sa pagnenegosyo, talagang minsan matumal ang benta.  Parte lang talaga ‘yun ng pagtitinda at hindi na ako masyadong nag-aalala na wala sa lugar. Meron na ako ngayong tiwala sa aking kaalaman, alam kong kakayanin kong bumangon (I learned that in business, there are ups and downs, I am not bothered by these. I am pretty sure that with just a little faith in myself, I can get back on my feet),” Norhaya proudly shared.

Norhaya added, “Ipinamulat sa akin ng mga programa ng DSWD na kaya ko naman pala ang magbago at mapaunlad ang aking kakayahan at ng aking pamilya (The program has made me realized that I can change for the better and improve myself and my family).” ###

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Summary of Foreign and Local Donations
As of September 01, 2014

P97,879,377.44 - Local Donations

USD23,766,111.40 - Foreign Donations


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