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The PAMANA is the national government’s program and framework for peace and development. It is implemented in areas affected by conflict and communities covered by existing peace agreements. It ensures that the communities benefit from improved delivery of basic services anda re served by responsive, transparent and accountable LGUs. In turn, DSWD implements PAMANA through the Kalahi-CIDSS, SLP, and PAMANA Pillar 2.

 

  • PAMANA Kalahi-CIDSS. This program was able to fund a total of 3, 886 sub-projects for 940, 943 households. A total of 3,100 sub-projects or 80% are already completed, directly benefiting 820, 147 households. These projects include infrastructure projects, day care centers, health stations, birthing rooms, concrete pathways, mini-wharfs, tri-people centers, multi-purpose pavements, water system, and installation of street lights.
  • PAMANA Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP). This program is implemented in identified conflict vulnerable areas (CVAs) in Regions VIII, IX, X, XII, and Caraga through a community cash grant or the PAMANA Peace and Development Fund (PDF). The cash grant amounts to Php 300,000 that is provided to duly qualified SLP Associations. A total of 356 projects were completed for the CY 2015 projects. To make it more sustainable, the DSWD provides SLP associations with enabling interventions, either on marketing, training, or additional technology/equipment, and a grant worth Php 50,000.00.
  • PAMANA Pillar 2. This program refers to the community-driven development interventions promoting the convergent delivery of services and goods focused on households and communities. Pillar 2 is implemented with a cash grant of Php 300,00 per barangay for a period of three years from CY 2012 to 2015. For the year, 24 projects were implemented in Regions X and XII as well as the Negros Island Region (NIR).

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In the world of migration, the Philippines is renowned as a major source country of global workers. From the 1970s, the number of Filipinos migrating to work abroad has followed an upward trend, with more than a million Filipino workers deployed annually to more than 200 countries and territories all over the world.

Because of the desire to uplift their living condition, many Filipinos travel abroad to work, and a significant number left the country without proper documents. These are the undocumented Overseas Filipinos (OFs) who are more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.

The DSWD, being the primary government agency responsible in providing protection and upholding the welfare of Filipinos wherever they maybe located, has conceptualized and implemented the International Social Welfare Services for Filipino Nationals (ISWSFN) Project in 2002. It is carried out through the deployment of social workers abroad who provide psychosocial interventions and other welfare and protection services to migrant Filipinos particularly the undocumented and the distressed.

The operationalization of the ISWSFN was initially by virtue of Administrative Order No. 57, s.2003, which was amended by MC No. 1, s.2012 and AO No. 7, s.2016 or the Guidelines in the Operation of the DSWD’s International Social Services Office (ISSO) in the Philippines and in Foreign Posts. Its aim is to ensure that the general welfare and rights of the Overseas Filipinos, primarily the undocumented and distressed Filipinos abroad and their families, are protected and promoted through the establishment of an effective and efficient system of SWAtt deployment and managing International Social Services Offices (ISSOs) both at the DSWD head office and in Foreign Posts.

The clientele of the SWAtts are the undocumented and distressed OFs and other Filipinos needing DSWD services who are:

• Victims of trafficking, illegal recruitment, rape/abuse/maltreatment by employers, kidnapping, and human-induced and natural disasters
• OFs with domestic/family problem in the host country and in the Philippines
• OFs with extra-marital relationship
• OFs in common law relationship
• Illegal entrant to the host country (“backdoor”)
• Overstaying (expired visa)
• Victims of Exploitation/Abuse/Maltreatment/Unfair Labor Practice/Confiscated Documents
• Accused/suspected of crime (under the custody of the Embassy, under the custody of relatives and friends, prisoners – crimes e.g. drugs, murder, robbery, etc., and detainees – absence/expired/fake legal document)
• Victims of natural and human-induced disasters (war,/armed conflict, political unrest, fire, earthquake, flooding, accident, and pandemic)
• Victims of Petty Crimes (Snatching/Robbery)
• Children in need of special protection (abused, abandoned, foundling, neglected, surrendered, orphaned, and on custody issue))
• Traveling Minors Accompanied by parents and other adults
• Filipinos applying for Legal Capacity to Contract Marriage (LCCM) Certificate (for provision of pre-marriage counseling)
• Filipinos needing information on DSWD services such as travel clearance for children and adoption
• OFs not in distress who participated in orientation sessions or capability building activities

The project employs the basic social work methods in managing the cases of undocumented and distressed OFs within the framework of the “One Country Team Approach.”

The following are the services and interventions which can be provided to overseas Filipinos in distress and the undocumented:

1. Psychosocial Services
• Counselling Services by either individual, group and family.
• Psychosocial processing (PSP)
• Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM)/Stress Debriefing (CISD)
• Socio-Cultural Activities
• Value Inculcation Services

2. Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situation (AICS)
• Transportation Assistance for repatriation and transportation within the post and in the Philippines
• Medical Assistance through provision of limited financial assistance for payment of consultation/medical examination, laboratory fees, hospitalization, and purchase of medicines.
• Material Assistance which includes but not limited to clothing, sleeping blankets/supplies, hygiene kit, and food.
• Communication assistance through provision of cell card or free-phone calls for those who have no means of contacting with their families/relatives in the Philippines
• Temporary Shelter assistance

3. Pre-marriage/Marriage Counselling
4. Referral Services
5. Training/Capability Building Activities
6. Other Services needed by OFs

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The Protective Services Program implemented by the PSFMO is composed of two components – 1) Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situation (AICS) and 2) Assistance to Communities in Need (ACN).

Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situations (AICS)

aics

The AICS serves as a social safety net or a stop-gap mechanism to support the recovery of individuals and families from unexpected crisis such as illness or death of a family member, natural and man-made calamities, and other crisis situation. It provides immediate rescue and protection, direct financial and material assistance, referrals for medical, legal, psychological, temporary shelter, and other services.
AICS covers the provision of medical, burial, educational, food and non-food assistance to individuals and families in crisis or difficult situation to enable them to meet their requirements for food and other immediate needs. The assistance may be in the form of outright cash, referral letters and guarantee letters.
Walk-in and referred clients are accommodated by the Crisis Intervention Unit (CIU) of DSWD Central Office and DSWD Field Offices, Social Welfare and Development (SWAD) Team and Provincial Action Team (PAT) Offices. The CIU is a special unit that serves as an action center to immediately respond to cases of individuals and families in crisis situations. The SWAD and PAT Offices serve as action centers to immediately respond to cases of individuals and families in crisis situations at the local level.

Assistance to Communities in Need (ACN)

acn

The ACN includes the provision of family food packs, provision of cash/food for work, repair/upgrading/construction of day care centers.
Family food packs are provided to victims of disaster to enable them to meet their food requirements and prevent hunger during the aftermath of a disaster. On the other hand, the cash/food for work is a short-term intervention or transition support to provide temporary employment to distressed/displaced individuals by participating in or undertaking preparedness, mitigation, relief, rehabilitation or risk reduction projects and activities in their communities or in evacuation centers as identified by the community.

In addition, the construction/repair/improvement of Day Care Centers is a mechanism to support the rights of children and provide a safer place while providing supplementary parental care to 3-5 years old children of parents while they are working. Meanwhile, the Senior Citizen Center is a place for the recreational, educational, health and social programs, and the facilities are designed for the full enjoyment and benefit of the senior citizens.

Revised PSFMO-OrgChart 2016

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The Recovery and Reintegration Program for Trafficked Persons is a comprehensive program that ensures adequate recovery and reintegration services provided to trafficked persons.

It utilizes a multi-sectoral approach, delivers a complete package of services that will enhance the psychosocial, social and economic needs of the clients. It also enhances the awareness, skills and capabilities of the clients, the families and the communities where the trafficked persons will be eventually reintegrated. It also improves community-based systems and mechanisms that ensures the recovery of the victim-survivors and prevents other family and community members to become victims of trafficking.

The programs and activities provided to victims of trafficking are Case Management and Direct Service Assistance which includes financial assistance for employment, financial assistance while undergoing skills training, capital assistance, referral to employers/ or business partners, educational assistance, medical assistance and provision of hygiene kits during rescue.

Coverage/Target Beneficiaries

The beneficiaries of the program are the following:
1. Victim-survivor of trafficking
2. Families of the victim-survivor of trafficking
3. Witnesses of cases of Human Trafficking
4. Communities with incidence of Human Trafficking

Objectives
• To provide capability-building activities that will enhance the skills of social workers and other service providers and implementers in providing effective and efficient services to trafficked persons;
• To institutionalize the National Referral System (NRS) and the National Recovery and Reintegration Database (NRRD);
• To ensure the delivery of comprehensive recovery and reintegration services for trafficked persons;
• To utilize multi-sectoral structures and mechanisms in the delivery of services that will enhance the psychosocial and economic needs of trafficked persons;
• To intensify the advocacy campaign against trafficking in persons to increase peoples’ awareness on issues of preventing them from becoming potential victims; and
• To upgrade/repair DSWD residential care facilities to accommodate victim-survivors of trafficking in persons.

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The Department assumes 2 roles in every disaster incident. This includes the inter-agency coordination during disaster response through the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) Response Pillar and provision of Social Protection Services including relief assistance, evacuation camp coordination and management, and Internally Displaced Person (IDP) Protection. With this, the DSWD was able to deliver the following:

 

  • Relief Assistance. This is the provision of Food and Non-Food Items (FNFI) to the disaster affected families. DSWD provided Php 358, 201, 168.07 worth of relief assistance to 696, 807 affected families in all regions. It was ensured that the IDPs inside and outside the evacuation centers were provided adequate assistance to sustain their basic food and shelter needs;
  • Cash-for-Work (CFW). This is a short-term intervention which provides transitional support and citizenship building through temporary employment in exchange for community works participated and/or trainings either along disaster mitigation, preparedness, response or early recovery and rehabilitation initiatives to provide alternative source of income to the families. DSWD provided Php 7, 7373, 030, 476.00 worth of financial assistance to 520, 002 affected families in Regions I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, V, Vi, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, NCR, CAR and ARMM;
  • Transitional Shelters. The DSWD provided 1, 386 shelters in partnership with International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Regions VIII and IX;
  • Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA). This refers to the provision of emergency “self-build” shelter assistance through limited materials or financial assistance to augment resources of affected families who opted not to be transferred to a resettlement site. ESA enables them to purchase shelter materials required in the construction or repair of damaged houses which were partially or totally destroyed as a result of natural or man-made disaster/calamity. DSWD provided Php 18, 778, 410, 000.00 worth of financial or material assistance to 1, 015, 737 families in Regions IV-B, VI, VI with damaged houses due to STY Yolanda; and
  • Core/Modified Shelter Assistance Program (C/MSAP). This is the provision of environment-friendly, structurally strng shelter units that can withstand up to 220 khp wind velocity, earthquakes up to intensity 4 of the Richter scale and other similar natural hazards in relocation sites provided by the national or local government units and using locally available materials to revitalize local economy. DSWD provided 74, 567 shelter units worth Php 5, 728, 560, 000.00 in partnership with UN Habitat, Habitat for Humanity and LGUs in Regions I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, V, Vi, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, NCR, CAR and ARMM.

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Supplementary Feeding Program (SFP) is the provision of food in addition to the regular meals to children currently enrolled in the day care centers as part of the DSWD’s contribution to the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) program of the government.

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Supplementary Feeding Program (SFP) is the provision of food in addition to the regular meals to children currently enrolled in the day care centers as part of the DSWD’s contribution to the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) program of the government.
Food supplementation is in the form of hot meals being served during break/snack time in the morning session or during break/snack time in the afternoon session to children in Day Care Centers (DCCs), and Supervised Neighborhood Play (SNP).

The feeding program is being managed by the parents based on a prepared meal cycle using available indigenous food supplies. Children beneficiaries are weighed at the start of the feeding period and three months thereafter. After the completion of 120 feeding days, the improvement and sustenance in the nutritional status of the beneficiaries will be determined.

Objectives
• To provide augmentation support for the feeding program of children in LGU-managed Child Development Centers (CDC)/SNP areas using indigenous foods and/or locally produced foods equivalent to 1/3 of Recommended Energy and Nutrient Intake (RENI).
• To improve knowledge, attitude and practices of children, parents and caregivers through intensified nutrition and health education; and
• To improve and sustain the nutritional status of the targeted children beneficiaries.

Target Beneficiaries
• 2-4 year-old children in Supervised Neighborhood Play;
• 4 year-old children enrolled in Child Development Centers; and
• 5 year-old children not enrolled in Child Development Centers, and;
• 5-12 year-old malnourished children outside the Child Development Centers.

Coverage
This program covers all of the Child Development Centers (CDCs) and Supervised Neigborhood Play (SNP) groups nationwide including ARMM

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Social Pension Program for Indigent Senior Citizens (SPISC) is the additional government assistance in the amount of Five Hundred Pesos (P500.00) monthly stipend to augment the daily subsistence and other medical needs of indigent senior citizens.

The program started in 2011 through Republic Act 9994 or the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010. The target beneficiaries of the program are the frail, sickly or with disability; with no regular income or support from family and relatives, and without pension from private or government institutions.

From 2011 to 2014, only 77 years -old and above were included in the program, but in 2015 the age requirement expanded by covering those who are 65 years and older. This 2016, 60 years old and above indigent senior citizens can avail the program.

Senior citizens who are not yet beneficiary but qualified within the eligibility criteria can apply at the Office of the Senior Citizens Affairs (OSCA), City/Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office, or the DSWD Regional Office. The Senior Citizen or his/her representative should bring his/her OSCA ID and Birth Certificate or any document that could prove his/her date of birth. The potential social pensioner will be subjected to an assessment based on the mentioned criteria.

 

Objectives

  • To improve the living condition of eligible indigent senior citizens
  • To augment capacity of indigent senior citizens to meet their daily subsistence and medical requirements
  • To reduce incidence of hunger among indigent senior citizens; and
  • To protect indigent senior citizens from neglect, abuse, or deprivation

 

Coverage

The Social Pension for indigent senior citizens is being implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) thru its (17) Field Offices in partnership with the Local Government Units (LGU). The City/ Municipal Social Welfare and Development Offices (C/MSWDO) and Office of the Senior Citizens Affairs (OSCA) serves as the key partners in the program implementation.

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VISION

The Department of Social Welfare and Development envisions all Filipinos free from hunger and poverty, have equal access to opportunities, enabled by a fair, just, and peaceful society.

 

MISSION

To lead in the formulation, implementation, and coordination of social welfare and development policies and programs for and with the poor, vulnerable, and disadvantaged.

 

Core Values and DSWD Brand

  • Maagap at Mapagkalingang Serbisyo
  • Serbisyong Walang Puwang sa Katiwalian
  • Patas na Pagtrato sa Komunidad

 

Organizational Outcomes

1. Well-being of poor families improved
2. Rights of poor and vulnerable sectors promoted and protected
3. Immediate relief and early recovery of disaster victims/survivors ensured
4. Continuing compliance of social welfare and development (SWD) agencies to standards in the delivery of social welfare services ensured
5. Delivery of social welfare and development (SWD) programs by local government units (LGUs), through local social welfare and development offices (LSWDOs), improved